The history of the Philippines from 1898 to 1946

The history of the Philippines from 1898 to 1946 - The...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

The history of the Philippines from 1898 to 1946 began with the outbreak of the Spanish–American War in April 1898, when the Philippines was still part of the Spanish East Indies , and concluded when the United States formally recognized the independence of the Republic of the Philippines on July 4, 1946. With the signing of the Treaty of Paris on December 10, 1898, Spain ceded the Philippines to the United States. [1] The interim U.S. military government of the Philippine Islands experienced a period of great political turbulence, characterized by the Philippine–American War . Beginning in 1901, the military government was replaced by a civilian government— the Insular Government of the Philippine Islands —with William Howard Taft serving as its first Governor-General . From 1901 to 1906 there also existed a series of revolutionary governments that lacked significant international diplomatic recognition . Following the passage of the Philippine Independence Act in 1934, a Philippine presidential election was held in 1935. Manuel L. Quezon was elected and inaugurated second President of the Philippines on November 15, 1935. The Insular Government was dissolved and the Commonwealth of the Philippines was brought into existence. The Commonwealth of the Philippines was intended to be a transitional government in preparation for the country's full achievement of independence in 1946. [2] After the Japanese invasion and subsequent occupation of the Philippines during World War II , the United States recaptured the Philippines in 1945. According to the terms of the Philippine Independence Act, [2] the United States formally recognized the independence of the Republic of the Philippines on July 4, 1946. The Philippine Revolution began in August 1896 and ended with the Pact of Biak-na-Bato , a ceasefire between the Spanish colonial Governor-General Fernando Primo de Rivera and the revolutionary leader Emilio Aguinaldo which was signed on December 15, 1897. The terms of the pact called for Aguinaldo and his militia to surrender. Other revolutionary leaders were given amnesty and a monetary indemnity by the Spanish government in return for which the rebel government agreed to go into exile in Hong Kong . [3] [4] [5] The failure of Spain to engage in active social reforms in Cuba as demanded by the United States government was the basic cause for the Spanish–American War. American attention was focused on the issue after the mysterious explosion that sank the American battleship Maine on February 15, 1898 in Havana Harbor . As public political pressure from the Democratic Party and certain industrialists built up for war, the U.S. Congress forced the reluctant Republican President William McKinley to issue an ultimatum to Spain on April 19, 1898. Spain found it had no diplomatic support in Europe, but nevertheless declared war ; the U.S. followed on April 25 with its own declaration of war.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Summer '06
  • Jdusndnksm
  • World War II, Philippine Republic, Japanese war crimes

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern