Eriksonpaper - Running head Erikson Personal Development...

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Running head: Erikson Personal Development Paper 1 Erikson Personal Development Paper Myla’Sha Williams Polk State College
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Erikson Personal Development Paper 2 DEP2004 23 April 2016 Erikson Personal Development Paper Erik Erikson was a developmental psychologist, whose identity theory described the different crises stages one goes through during periods in life. His theory is comprised of nine stages, each one covering a specific developmental period in one’s life. The first developmental period is infancy, which covers birth to the end of the first year. During this stage, an individual will go through the crisis stage of trust vs. mistrust, where they learn who to trust and who not to trust. The outcome that one wishes for the infant to achieve in this stage is the development of trust towards itself, its parents, and the outside world. During the second developmental period, from ages two to three, the individual goes through a crisis stage of autonomy vs. shame and self doubt. This is the stage where the individual develops increased mobility and must begin making decisions on what to and not to do. The positive outcome wished for in this stage is to develop self control and keep self esteem. The third developmental period, ages four to five, focuses on the initiative vs. guilt stage of psychological development. During this developmental stage, children learn to be curious about objects and how to handle objects, teaching them the purpose in activities. In the fourth developmental period, from ages six to twelve starting puberty, Erikson theorized that the individual would come into the industry vs. inferiority stage of development, beginning the questioning of how things are made and how they operate. The believed outcome for this stage was the individual developing a sense of understanding of the world’s workings and the ability to complete tasks on their own. After puberty comes the fifth developmental period, occurring during adolescence ages thirteen to nineteen, the individual enters the identity vs. identity confusion stage of development. During this stage, the individual
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Erikson Personal Development Paper 3 begins the search for their own identity and asking who they are. The projected end result of this stage is to develop a sense of self and identity, as to know their ego and gain a sense of coherence. In the sixth developmental period, which occurs during early adulthood, during ages twenty to thirty nine, allows for the beginning of the intimacy vs. isolation. During this stage, the individual begins to form relationships with new people, creating friendships and connections with others as well as become able to reach out to others. The intended outcome for this stage is to become more motivated to work towards one’s career goals and to begin an intimate relationship with someone. Once the individual gets to the seventh developmental period, occurring in middle adulthood, during ages forty to sixty four, they begin to become less self minded and become more mindful of society and future generations. At the end of
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  • Fall '15
  • Developmental Psychology, Erikson's stages of psychosocial development, Erikson Personal Development Paper, Erikson Personal Development, Personal Development Paper

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