Yogurt Making - Activity 8 Yogurt Making(Plain Greek style...

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September 16, 2015 Activity 8: Yogurt Making (Plain Greek style) I. Objectives 1. To know the chemical and physical processes involved in Yogurt manufacturing. 2. To identify and properly use the tools/equipment and the ingredients involved. 3. To be able to package and present the final product for market circulation. II. Historical Background Throughout history, people have been consuming fermented dairy products as a primary nutrition source and yogurt is considered one of the oldest in production and consumption. It is agreed that yogurt was accidentally discovered through storing milk in primitive Methods resulting in bacterial fermentation and curdling of milk. Such a history dates back to 6000 BC in Neolithic Central Asia when people preferred the texture, taste and consistency of the product that eventually led to commercial yogurt making. In the period of industrialization, yogurt production is credited to have been started by Isaac Carasso in Barcelona in 1919 with his company “Danone”. Turkish immigrants did initially brought yogurt to the US since the 17 th and 18 th century but it did not bloom into mass production until Daniel Carasso (son of Isaac Carasso) with his company Danone (now Dannon) popularized for production in the 1940s. Its popularity then soared in the 1950s and 1960s with several style variations and fruit ingredients. Now, yogurt is one of the widely sold fermented products ever since the boom of health food culture. III. Theoretical Background Yogurt is a fermented, low-to high-acid semisolid cultured milk product (Vedamuthu, 1991; Chandan, 2002; Sha, 2003; Thamime and Robinson, 2007; FDA, 2011). The process starts with the procurement and storage of milk followed by heat treatment to kill contaminating bacteria and inactivate enzymes in milk. This also expels oxygen and 1 | P a g e
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producing protein-cleaved nitrogenous compounds. These enhance the growth and development of desirable in growth culture. The milk is then undergoes inoculation with yogurt starter culture at optimum temperatures of 41-42C. Fermentation then takes place which convert sugars in milk into lactic acid which leads to the curdling of the milk. The general Chemistry goes: Lactose ST or LB bacteria 2 L(+)-Lactic acid + 3 acetic acid The bacteria required in modern PDA standards are Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (LB). The product is then incubated and then cooled to cold temps. (5-22 C) with fruit and other additives/flavoring are then incorporated. The general changes in milk structure which also lead to curdling is a result of heat treatment with proteins changing structures to form different physio-chemical properties. The main protein in milk casein.
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  • Summer '15
  • Chemistry, pH, Danone, yoghurt, Dairy product, yogurt, fermented milk products

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