HIS 101 4-6-16 HW - Chapter 14 Civil War stopped at picture...

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Chapter 14 Civil War stopped at picture of 2 black men IV 1. Why did Lincoln’s election lead the Southern secession? Lack of intervention on the Federal government’s part. He needed troops to help resupply Fort Sumter. While he did not intend to invade Southern states, he would use force to maintain possession of federal property within seceded states. Attention quickly shifted to the federal installation of Fort Sumter. The assault on Fort Sumter, and subsequent call for troops, provoked several Upper South states to join the Confederacy. In total, eleven states renounced their allegiance to the United States of America. 2. In what ways did fugitive slaves and the military reshape the Lincoln administration’s policy on slavery during the Civil War? (you will need to read all of section V, in order to answer this question) Slaves were within Union military. Soldiers were forbidden to interfere with slavery or assist runaways. Fugitive slaves could provide useful information on the local terrain and the movements of Confederate troops. Union officers became particularly reluctant to turn away fugitive slaves when Confederate commanders began forcing slaves to work on fortifications. Every slave who escaped to Union lines was a loss to the Confederate war effort. Emancipation. Slaves could participate in the war. 3. What was life in the Union army like for black soldiers? They endured rampant discrimination and earned less pay than white soldiers, while also facing the possibility of being murdered or sold into slavery if captured by Confederate forces. Black soldiers symbolized the embodiment of liberation and the destruction of slavery. Southerners saw them as disrupting Old South’s racial and social hierarchy. (Black soldier walked by Confederate prisoners and saw his former master there.) They earned their citizenship through service and voluntarism, and battlefield contributions 4. In what ways did women participate in war efforts? They were nurses (to Union prisoner). Some disguised as men. They danced with men and kept them in hope. Took leadership role in the sanitary fairs, the fairs encouraged national unity within the North In spring 1863 consistent food shortages led the “bread riots” in Confederate cities. Confederate women led mobs to protest food shortages in South. Using their political control, women impacted the war through violent actions, petitions for aid and release of husbands from military service.
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