PHYS
DISASTER RISK REDUCTION MANAGEMENT

DISASTER RISK REDUCTION MANAGEMENT - DISASTER RISK...

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DISASTER RISK REDUCTION MANAGEMENT
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What is Disaster Risk Reduction? DISASTER RISK REDUCTION (DRR) There is no such thing as a 'natural' disaster, only natural hazards. Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) aims to reduce the damage caused by natural hazards like earthquakes, floods, droughts and cyclones, through an ethic of prevention. Disasters often follow natural hazards. A disaster's severity depends on how much impact a hazard has on society and the environment. The scale of the impact in turn depends on the choices we make for our lives and for our environment. These choices relate to how we grow our food, where and how we build our homes, what kind of government we have, how our financial system works and even what we teach in schools. Each decision and action makes us more vulnerable to disasters - or more resilient to them. Disaster risk reduction is about choices. Disaster risk reduction is the concept and practice of reducing disaster risks through systematic efforts to analyse and reduce the causal factors of disasters. Reducing exposure to hazards, lessening vulnerability of people and property, wise management of land and the environment, and improving preparedness and early warning for adverse events are all examples of disaster risk reduction.
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Disaster Preparedness: A Social‐ Cognitive Perspective Author(s): Douglas Paton (Douglas Paton is Associate Professor in the School of Psychology, University of Tasmania, Launceston, Tasmania, Australia.) Citation: Douglas Paton , (2003) "Disaster preparedness: a social‐cognitive perspective", Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, Vol. 12 Iss: 3, pp.210 - 216 Downloads: The fulltext of this document has been downloaded 4803 times since 2006 Abstract: Despite considerable effort and expenditure on public hazard education, levels of disaster preparedness remain low. By integrating and expanding on natural hazards and health research on protective behaviour, this paper proposes a social cognitive model of disaster preparedness. The model describes a developmental process that commences with factors that motivate people to prepare, progresses through the formation of intentions, and culminates in decisions to prepare. Following their critical appraisal, variables implicated
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  • Fall '14
  • disaster risk reduction

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