surveys - A Selection from Survival Statistics Copyright...

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A Selection from Survival Statistics Copyright David S. Walonick, 1997 - 2010 All Rights Reserved ISBN 0-918733-11-1 Published by: StatPac, Inc., 8609 Lyndale Ave. S. #209A, Bloomington, MN 55420 Tel: (715) 442-2261 Fax: (715) 442-2262 Web: Email: [email protected] You must be completely satisfied or we will refund the entire purchase price. Right now you can order Survival Statistics for just $29.95 Order online and we'll email you instructions on how to download the book. Click Here To Order
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Designing and Using Questionnaires This is the information age. More information has been published in the last decade than in all previous history. Everyone uses information to make decisions about the future. If our information is accurate, we have a high probability of making a good decision. If our information is inaccurate, our ability to make a correct decision is diminished. Better information usually leads to better decisions. Ways to Get Information There are six common ways to get information. These are: literature searches, talking with people, focus groups, personal interviews, telephone surveys, and mail surveys. A literature search involves reviewing all readily available materials. These materials can include internal company information, relevant trade publications, newspapers, magazines, annual reports, company literature, on-line data bases, and any other published materials. It is a very inexpensive method of gathering information, although it generally does not yield timely information. Literature searches take between one and eight weeks. Talking with people is a good way to get information during the initial stages of a research project. It can be used to gather information that is not publicly available, or that is too new to be found in the literature. Examples might include meetings with prospects, customers, suppliers, and other types of business conversations at trade shows, seminars, and association meetings. Although often valuable, the information has questionable validity because it is highly subjective and might not be representative of the population. A focus group is used as a preliminary research technique to explore people’s ideas and attitudes. It is often used to test new approaches (such as products or advertising), and to discover customer concerns. A group of 6 to 20 people meet in a conference-room-like setting with a trained moderator. The room usually contains a one-way mirror for viewing, including audio and video capabilities. The moderator leads the group's discussion and keeps the focus on the areas you want to explore. Focus groups can be conducted within a couple of weeks and cost between two and three thousand dollars. Their disadvantage is that the sample is small and may not be representative of the population in general.
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