Type one final - DIABETES TYPE 1 NRS-434V Health...

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DIABETES TYPE 1 July 24, 2016 NRS-434V Health Assessment Jun 27, 2016 (OL191) Instructor: Lisa Arends Students: 1
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CRITERIA, DEFINITION, PREVALENCE Criteria for diagnose Fasting plasma glucose ≥126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) on at least two occasions Symptoms of hyperglycemia and a plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) Plasma glucose ≥200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) measured two hours after a standard glucose load in an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Hemoglobin A1C ≥6.5 Definition insulin deficiency following destruction of the insulin- producing pancreatic beta cells autoimmune disease arising through a complex interaction of both genetic and immunologic factors Prevalence the incidence of T1DM in non-Hispanic white children and adolescents is 23.6 per 100,000 per year. Prevalence: of diabetes among adults in the United States ranges from 5.8 to 12.9 percent (median 8.4 percent) . With associated microvascular and macrovascular disease, diabetes accounts for almost 14 percent of United States health care expenditures. 2
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TYPE 1 VS. TYPE 2, CLINICAL PRESENTATION TYPE 1 75% not obese and H/O weight loss, Earlier age. 45% percent of children before 10 years of age Insulin resistant are less Family history –10% Insulin and C-peptide levels are inappropriately low Not obese, weight loss Rate are rising. TYPE 2 Body habitus, Obese >95% percentile all cases, after 10 years , puberty Patients with T2DM frequently have acanthosis nigricans, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and polycystic ovary syndrome (in girls). 75 % to 90 % T2DM have an affected close relative High fasting insulin and C- peptide levels suggest T2DM. Obese, [BMI] ≥95th percentile Presentation Type 1 is 10% of all cases. Bimodal distribution 4 to 6 and 10 to 14 years of age genetic and environmental factors Classic new onset of chronic polydipsia, polyuria, and weight loss with hyperglycemia and ketonemia (or ketonuria) Diabetic ketoacidosis Silent (asymptomatic) incidental discovery 3
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IMPACT OF DIABETES IN CHILDHOOD. Infancy (0 to 12 month) Preventing and treating hypoglycemia Coping with stress Avoiding extreme fluctuations in blood glucose levels Sharing the burden of care to avoid parent burnout Toddler(13 to 26 moth) Preventing hypoglycemia Establishing a schedule Avoiding extreme fluctuations in blood glucose Sharing the burden of care Preschooler (3 to 7 years) Preventing hypoglycemia appetite and activity Educating Positively reinforcing cooperation Management with regimen Trusting other caregivers with diabetes management 4
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IMPACT OF DIABETES IN ADOLESCENCE Older elementary school (8–11 years) Making diabetes regimen flexible Maintaining parental involvement management tasks while Child learning short- and long-term benefits of optimal control Continuing to educate Early adolescence (12–15 years) Increasing insulin
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  • Summer '16
  • Lisa Areands
  • Diabetes, Disease, CLC - Health Promotion Present, Adult Clients With Childhood D, American Diabetes Association

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