OB11_IM14 - Robbins Organizational Behavior Chapter...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

Robbins: Organizational Behavior Chapter Fourteen CONFLICT AND NEGOTIATION CHAPTER 14 OUTLINE A Definition of Conflict 1. There are several common themes which underlie most definitions: The parties to it must perceive conflict. Commonalties in the definitions are opposition or incompatibility and some form of interaction. 2. We define conflict as “a process that begins when one party perceives that another party has negatively affected, or is about to negatively affect, something that the first party cares about.” This describes that point when an interaction “crosses over” to become an inter-party conflict. It encompasses the wide range of conflicts that people experience in organizations. Transitions in Conflict Thought 1. The traditional view of conflict argues that it must be avoided—it indicates a malfunctioning with the group. 2. The human relations view argues that conflict is a natural and inevitable outcome in any group and that it need not be evil, but has the potential to be a positive force in determining group performance. 3. The inter-actionist approach proposes that conflict can be a positive force in a group but explicitly argues that some conflict is absolutely necessary for a group to perform effectively. A. The Traditional View 1. This early approach assumed that all conflict was bad. Conflict was synonymous with such terms that reinforced its negative connotation. By definition, it was harmful and was to be avoided. 2. This view was consistent with the prevailing attitudes about group behavior in the 1930s and 1940s. Conflict was seen as a dysfunctional outcome resulting from poor communication, a lack of openness and trust between people, and the failure of managers to be responsive to their employees. B. The Human Relations View 1. Conflict is a natural occurrence in all groups and organizations. Since it was natural and inevitable it should be accepted. 2. It cannot be eliminated and may even contribute to group performance. 3. The human relations view dominated conflict theory from the late 1940s through the mid-1970s. C. The Interactionist View 1. The Interactionist view is the one taken in this chapter. 2. This approach encourages conflict on the grounds that a harmonious, peaceful, tranquil, and cooperative group is prone to becoming static and non-responsive to needs for change and innovation. 1
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Robbins: Organizational Behavior Chapter Fourteen 3. Group leaders maintain enough conflict to keep the group viable, self-critical, and creative. 4. Whether a conflict is good or bad depends on the type of conflict. Functional vs. Dysfunctional Conflict 1. Not all conflicts are good. Functional, constructive forms of conflict support the goals of the group and improve its performance. Conflicts that hinder group performance are dysfunctional or destructive forms of conflict.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern