ANALYSE DATA - ANALYSE DATA Finding and Conclusion a...

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ANALYSE DATA : Finding and Conclusion a) DESCRIPTIVE b) INFERENCE a) DESCRIPTIVE: HOW TO RUN FREQUENCY COUNT for Nominal data Step 1. Select Analyse -> Descriptive Statistics -> Frequencies In Frequency dialogue box select e.g. Social demographic such as GENDER then click right arrow to move variable to the variable box 2. Select Statistics, tick Mean, Minimum, Maximum, then click Continue 3. Select Chart -> tick Bar Charts, then click Continue 1
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Frequency count allow us to look at data structure and compute basic statistics about the distribution of the variable and it allows us to display data distribution in graphical form. b) EXPLORATORY DATA ANALYSIS for ordinal or interval or ratio data Step 1. Select Analyse -> Descriptive Statistics -> Explore In Explore dialogue box select Your DV and click the right arrow near the Dependent List. Under Display, select Both. Select Factor List e.g. Social demographic such as GENDER then click right arrow to move variable to the variable box 2. Select Statistics, tick Descriptive and Outliers in the Explore : Statistics dialogue box Under Confidence interval for Mean, type 95, then click Continue. 3. Click Plot and under Box plots select Factor level together, then under Descriptive tick Stem and leaf and Histogram and Normality plots with test. then click Continue 4. Click Options and in the Explore: Option dialogue box, select Exclude cases listwise. then click Continue, select Ok. 2
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Researchers compute descriptive statistics to describe the numerical characteristics of their data, however, descriptive statistics do not tell us the underlying dynamics of the data. To understand the further into the relationships of variables, we need to compute inferential statistics. Inferential statistics use the law of probability to make inferences and draw statistics researchers to generalize to a population based on information obtained from a limited number of research respondents. Inferential statistics are important because it is not possible in most instances to collect data from populations. In order to make valid statistical estimations about populations, the researcher use RANDOM SAMPLES.
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