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Lecture5_20160520ans

Lecture5_20160520ans - Phonetics LIN203 Lecture 5 Summary...

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Phonetics LIN203 – Lecture 5
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Summary Review Learning Outcomes Produc<on of speech sounds Vocal Anatomy Consonants Phona<on and voicing Places of ar<cula<on Manners of ar<cula<on Obstruents Stops (plosives), frica<ves and affricates Sonorants Nasals, liquids and glides Vowels and diphthongs
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i>clicker question… 1. /z/, /s/ and /əz/ are all _____ of the same ____ used as a plural marker for nouns? a. morphs, lexeme b. allomorphs, morph c. lexemes, morpheme d. allomorphs, morpheme
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i>clicker question… 2. The word pair tooth-teeth illustrates a allomorphic process referred to as _____. a. ablaut b. La<n vowel weakening c. umlaut d. supple<on
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i>clicker question… 3. Which of the following word groups illustrates supple*on in the create of word forms?
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Learning Outcomes By the end of this lecture, you should be able to: 1. to describe the phona<on mechanisms involved in speech produc<on 2. to explain how the different gestures and posi<ons of the vocal organs correspond to different speech sounds 3. to refer to and contrast different English speech sounds using the appropriate phone<c terms 4. to explain how adjacent speech sounds may affect one another using the appropriate terminology
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i>clicker question… 4. Which of the 4 learning outcomes is the most important in this lesson?
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Speech production: the Source- Filter Model
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How do we make speech sounds?
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Airstream Mechanisms English All sounds are pulmonic egressive Pulmonic Powered by air expelled by the lungs Egressive Air travels from inside the body to the outside
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Vocal Organs
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The Pharynx Just above the larynx About 7cm long in women and about 8 cm long in men Divided into 2 parts 1. Back of the oral cavity 2. Beginning of the way through the nasal cavity
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The Pharynx Pharyngeal sounds are made by ar<cula<on between the root of the tongue and the pharynx. Example: /ħ/, not used in English
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The Soft Palate/Velum At the back of the roof of the oral cavity where there is an opening between the oral and nasal cavi<es
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The Soft Palate/Velum Can be raised and lowered to allow air to pass through the nose and/or the mouth Raise: no air is allowed to pass through the nasal cavity, speech sound made is referred to as “oral” Lowered: air is allowed to pass through the nasal cavity, speech sound made is referred to as “nasal”
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The Soft Palate/Velum Velar sounds are made by ar<cula<on between the back of the tongue and the sof palate/velum Examples: /g/ as in “game”, /k/ as in “car”, /ŋ/ as in “sing”
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The Hard Palate Palatal sounds are made by ar<cula<on between the tongue and the hard palate.
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  • Summer '09
  • DanielZingaro
  • Computer Programming, Vowel, International Phonetic Alphabet, Alveolar Ridge, clicker question…

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