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Unformatted text preview: 30 onto DUC VA 9A0 T40 KY THI TRUNG HQC PHD THONG QUOC GIA NAM 2015 men: TIENG ANH' BE T311 mono mm: m: gran ram bdi: 9o prim, thong ké’ thd'i gian phér as? (92" do ed 06 Wang) W C M! at on 582 H9 or ten thi sin J""“' 36 baa daoh sea-ton A (a points) rJ Marth‘rehttern, B, c, waonyourmrnheettoindicate the momminedpad mmmmmmmmem {trench orchefoflowmgquosfions. Question 1!? notim B. approachfl c. finished D. supportfl Question 2: A. clan B. deal 6 brat D. lead-r _m.rktfre!etterfl, A. G «Dmmrammtmimmflre mmmrmnamdre other three-in dram ofprfmaryso-min each urine Mooring questions. ! Question 3: A. conquer -flconse-ve c. conceal . D. contain I, Question 4rd. Influential -. compulsory oceanic D. advaoiageous {Jr-5 l“ . Question 5: A. candidate B. commitment recipe D. instrument '3 3 { MarkflreloflrA, a. q. wDanyomeeetoommeetfiemredamwtoeadrafflm Manqveeflons. Question 6:15 large error inventions and disco ‘ have been made I accident. A. on ' t D. by Question 7: Changes have n made in our prime ooiing program. As a result, young children __ dc homework any more. _- _ A. haven't (Quotient c. oughtn‘t MW e. needn't Question 8: The headm a ' ed that three lecture halls___ in our school next semester. A. will be built E §§fll be building c. are being built D. will build Question 9: The reception , __ acme-red the p e, toid me that the director was out. A. whose B. that horn D. who Queetion 10: Students will not be allowed into the room if they ____thpir‘etudent cards. A. produced B. didn’t produce C. don't produce titJadn‘t produced Quesflorr 11: Aldicugh MERE (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) spreads through close contact with sick , not through the air, many people still avoid to crowded pieces. go 3. having gone C. going gone on 12: the salesman promised to exchange the defective CD player for a new one, they insisted on gating a refund. m A. Despite fiffliough @And But Question 13: It is _ . sinessmenvto shake hands in fennel meetings. A. typical ® ordinal-veil; /’ c. common D. familiar Quation 14: A moiecule of water ls ' ' ; ".fifl'bfltwc atoms of hydrogen and one atom of oxygen. A. created B. consisted ' __ ': .. c. included “composed fer" 15: Jane really loves the jewelry box that her parents gave he a birthday present. ' 3 nice brown wooden B. nloe wooden brown c. wooden brown nice - own wmen nice 'ho a" r- . on 15: When asked about their preference for movies, many young peop y that they are in favour science fiction. A. of a. in c. for ® with Question 17: Global warming will result crop ', urea and famine. I. from B. in ’ C‘ to D. of Question 18: After the new tedmique had been int , the factory produced cars in 2014 as the year before. -_ A. as many twice it. as twice many c. twice as many D. twice many as -.. Treng U6 - me at thi 532 Question 19: John has finally found a new job after being __ for three men . A. out of mind B. out of order C. out of reach lyout of work Quesflon 20: Nguyen Thi Anh Vien performed so well In the 23" Sea Games women's 200m butterfly that none of-her rivals could _ her. _ Acatchupwlth whokupto ..t.‘. putupwlth _. meupto Question 21: Such cha - "gr; as fairies or witches in Walt Disney animated ca ns are purely _. A. imagining -' 2: imaginable C. imaginary D. imaginative (Nation 22: at -- -| yesterday when we were Informed that there was no class due to a sudden power cut. We have hardly arrived B. Hardly had we arrived a had arrived hardly D. Hardly we had arrived [email protected] 23: Ken and Tom are high- -school students. They are discussing where their study group will meet. Select the most suitable response to fill in the blank. Ken: ‘Where is our study group going to meet next weekend?” Tom: “ " We are too busy on weekdays. B. Studying in a group is great fun. Why don't you look at the atlas? D. The library would be best. Q on 24: Mike and Lane are university students. They are talking about Lane's upcoming high-school reunion. Select the most suitable response to fill' In the blank. Mike: “So you have your fifth high- -school reunion coming up?" Lane: " " - . No. You're In no mood for the event. on, the school reunion was wonderful. Yeah. I'm really looking forward to it. '. The food at his reunion was eccellent. Mmmrww4 B, G air-D mmmmetoolndicaos the morons) aosssrrn meaning to the undefined We) in each of fire following questions. Question 25: When Susan invited us to dinner, she really showed off her guinea talents. She prepared a feast - a huge selection of dishes that were simply mouth-watering. in. having to do with food and cooking 5. involving hygienic conditions and diseases .-_.reiating to medical knowledge o. concerning nutrition and health -- .. ~n 26: Suddenly, it began to rain heavily. so all "the summer hikers got all over. cleansed a. completely wet c. very tired refreshed For: 27: “It’s no use talking on me about metaphysics. It's Emma—0km." .a subject that I don‘t understand B. a theme that] like to discuss txc' a hook that is never opened D. an object that I really love MWWA, B, c, orDonyonramsheet-tofndm the undevfhednartflratnoeds Winmchoflhe £5!anqu Question 28: Since LLLL. in . Is becoming more m, the govemment has imposed Medan: B C O. to prevent it. D Question 29: It is ggmmgn knmledge that solar heating for a largegmg building is | different A B Warns. D Question 30: The number of homeless people in Nepal 3: Increased sharply m the recent A i c D . Question 3km not to miss W the manager set out for: the station Mfix. it B C Question 32: All the candidates for the sghoiarship will be equally treated Wig of their age, sex, A B or concealin- D Trang— 2n; - M5 at thi 532 Mark the letter-A, a, C; orb on your answer-sheet to indicate the waters) OPPOSIIE in meaning to the WM war-W5) in each of the rationing Was. Question 33: “Don‘t be such a minis. I'm sure you' _ can get over it. Cheer up!” _ A. activist B. hobbyist ' optimist D. feminist Question 34: “Be quick! We must W2 if we wantto miss the fiigh _ your: down 8. look up 1:. slow down put forward Rea-affine folfawlngpamgeandmm the father-A, B, a, darn myowanswersbeet comments the Wammeadh offlze quasflmfivmflmfl. Planls and animals will find k difllwlt to escape from or adjust to the effects of global warming. Scientists m._ake§dy..omwwdshifls in the lifecydes of many plants and animals, such as flowers blooming eariier and birds hatching earlier in the spring. Many species have begun shifting where they live or their annual migration patterns due to warmer temperatures. mm further warming, animals will tend to migrate toward the poles and up mountainsldas toward higher elevations. Plants will also atbempt to shift their ranges, seeking new areas as old habitats grow too warm. In many places, however, human development will prevent these shifts. Species that find cities or farmland blocking their way north or south may become extinct. Species living in unique. eoosystems,__su£hwas those fo_u__ndtjn_polar_and_mountaintogm_' ions, are especially at risk because migration to' new habitats'ls‘hdt possible. For example, polar bears an “r‘narlne mammals in the Arctic are already threatened by dwindling sea ice but have nowhere farther north to go. W Projecting spades extinction due to global warming is extremely difficult. Some scientists have estimated that. 20 tfl.__5_0,__l?§|’.i3§_lE..Qf specificould be..comrnitted to extinction wltli2h93 gelsius degrees of further warming. The rate of warming, not just the magnitude, is extremely important for plants and animals. Some speciesand even entire ecosystems, such as certain types of forest, may not be able to adjust old: enough seaweewear- " ‘”'" Ocean eonsystems, especially fragile ones like coral reefs, will also be affected by global warming. Warmer ocean temperatures can cause coral to “bleach", a state which if prolonged will lead to the death of the coral. Scientists estimate that even 1 Celsius degree of additional warming could lead to widespread bleaching and death of coral reefs around the world. Also, increasmg carbon dioxide in the atmosphere enters the ocean and increases the acidity of ocean waters. This acidification further stresses ocean ecosystems. From WW Mammy Mldaael Mastrandrea and When H. Schneider Question 35: Scientists have observed that warmer temperatures in the sprin- - use flowers to A. die instantly” B. lose color C. become lighter a plow: earlier Question 36: According to paragraph 2, when their habitats grow warmer, animals tend to move . ”Mirth-eastwards and down mountainsides wizard lower elevations .5 ‘ 9.. toward the poles and up mountainsides toward higher devotions “C. north—westwards and up rnountalnsldes toward higher elevations D. toward the North Pole and down mountainsides toward lower elevations Question 37: The pronoun “those? in paragraph 2 to . ecosystems A. areas ‘ 3. species D. habltats Question 33: The phrase “dwindling sea ice" in paragraph 2 refersto . A. the cold ice in the Arctic B. the melting ice in the Arctic the frozen water in the Arctic D. the violent Arctic Ocean Question 39: It is mentioned in the passage that if the global temperature rose by 2.or 3 Celsius degrees, A. water supply would decrease by 50 percent B. the sea level would rise by 20 centimeters c. half of the earth’s surface would be flooded Q 20 to 50 percent of species could become extinct action 40: According to the passage, if some species are not able to adjust quickly to warmer temperatures, . ‘ they will certainly need water B. they move to tropical forests can begin to develop D. they may be endangered Question 41: The word “fragile” in paragraph 4 mos robab ans . A. pretty hard B. very large C or strong D. easily damaged Trang are - Me as thi 582 Quesfion 42: The bleaching of coral reefs as mentioned In paragraph 4 indicates . A. the slow death of coral reefs B. the: water absorption of coral reefs the quick growth of marine mammals D. the blooming phase of sea weeds 43: The level of acidity in the ocean is dimasedpvw. 'A. decrease of acidity of the polewalfrs'“ . the loss of acidity In the atmosphere around the earth c. the rising amount of carbon dioxide entering the ocean D. the extinction of species in coastal areas Question :14: _ What does the passage mainly discuss? A. Effects of global wannlng on animals and plants 3. Influence of climate changes on human lifestyles C. Global warming and species migration .z‘lobai warming and sesame solutions “spiel—new o... Read the followingpassageandmartflrefeflerd, A. G era on morons-wanes: toinoi‘cate the Wander-plum thatbestfitseaa‘r ofdrenumberedbtmm 45m 54. Ubranr is aoollectbn of books and other informational materials made available to people for reading, study, or reference. The word library comes (45) fiber} the Latin word for “book". (46) library coflecfions have almost always contained a variety of materials. Contemporary libraries maintain Collections that include not only printed materials such as manuscripts, books, nauspapers, and magazines, (47) audio-visual and online databases. In addition (48) maintaining collections within library buildings, modern libraries often feature telecommunications links that provide users with access to information at remote sites. The central mission of a library (49) to colleet, organize, preserve, and provide access to knowledge and infonnation. In fulfilling this mission, libraries preserve a valuable record ofculture that can be passed down to (50) generations. Libraries are an essential link in this communication between the past, present, and future. Whether the cultural record is contained in books or In electronic fonnats, libraries ensure (51) the record Is preserved and tirade available for later use. People use library resources to gain information about personal (52) or to obtain recreational materials such as films and novels. Students use libraries to supplement and enhance their classroom experiences, to learn (53) in locating sources of information, and to develop good reading and study habits. Public ofiiclals use libraries to research legislation and public policy issues. One of the most valued of all cultural institutions, the library (54) information and services that are essential to learning and progress. From “library {new a. )" by Richard 5. Halsey etal. Question 45: from B. out C. in a Question Infiéflowever 3. Despite erefore D. Instead Question 47: A. as well 5. only if E C. Eat also I). or else Question 48: A. to B. in . from on Question 49: A. is F as C. are have Question so: A. succeed - a. coessful c. succeeding . - success Question-51: . what . that :1. who ' which Question sé attractions B. interests C. appeals D. profits Question 53: A. talents B. abilities k C. Skills D. capacities Question 54: A. digests B. supplies - 0., ppllles D. relates Readflte Mangpamgeandmaflrflremfl, B, c; oramyourammettoindicatem Wamweraoemn attire questions nun: 55:064. Overpcpulation, the Situation of having large numbers of people with too few resources and too little space, is closer associated with poverty. it can result from high population density, or from low amounts of resources, or from both. Excessively high population densities put stress on available resources. Only a certain number of people can-be supported on a given area of land, and that number depends on how much food and other resources the land can provide. In countries where people live primarily by means of simple farming, gardening, herding, hunting, and gathering, even large areas of land can support gdxgmaflpumbers of peoplebecause these labor-inmnsive subsistence activities produce only small amounts of food. ' Trang 4m - ME at thi 532 In developed countries such as the United States, Japan, and the counties of Western Europe, mamopuiation generally is not considered a major cause of poverty. These countries produm large quantities of food through mechanized farming, which depends on commercial fertilizers, large-scale irrigation, and agricmbrral machinery. This form of production provides enough food to support the high densities of people in metropolitan areas. A country’s level of poverty can depend greatly on ils mix of population density and agricultural productivity. Bangladesh, for example, has one of the world's highest population densities, with 1,147 persons per sq km. A large majority of the people of Bangladesh engage in low-producthrity manual farming, which contributes to die country’s extremely high level of poverty. Some of the smaller countries in Western Europe, such as the Netherlands and Belgium, have high population densities as well. These countries practice mechanized farming and are involved in high-tech industries, however, and therefore have high standards of living. At the other end of the spectrum, many countries in sub-Saharan Africa have population densities of less than 30 persons per sq km. Marry people in these countries practice manual subsistence fanning; these countries also have infertile land, and lack the economic resources and technology to boost productivity. As a consequence, thesefiaflons are very poor. The United States has” both relatively low population density and high agricultural productivity; it is one of the world's wealthiest nations. High birth rates contribute to overpopulation in many deviehping countries. Children are assets to many poor families because they provide labor, usually for farming. Cultural norms in traditionally rural societies commonly sanction the value of large families. Also, the governments of developing countries often provide little or no support, financial or political, for family planning; even people who wish to keep their families small have difficulty doing so. For all these reasons, developing countries tend to have high rates of population growth. Prom “Poverty“ by Thomas J. Corbett Question 55: Which of the following is given a definl 'n paragraph 1? A. Poverty B. Simple farming erpopulatlon 0. Population density Question 56: What will suffer when there are as high population densities? A. Farming methods 3. Skilled labor Land area D. Available researces Question 57: The phrase “that number” in paragraph 1 refers to the number f... . A. countries . B. resources c. densities 0.. * pie Question 58: In certain countries, large areas of la n only yield small amounts of food because . A. there is no shortage of skilled labor .there are small numbers of laborers - C. there is lack of mechanization B. there is an abundance of resources Question 59: Bangladesh is a country where the level of WW. depends greatly on . both population density and agricultural productivity” population density only , . its high agricultural productivity D. population density in metropolitan areas Question 60: The phrase “engage in" in paragraph 3 is closest in meaning to . A. give up look into c. participate in D. escape from Q on 61: The word “in rtlle" in paragraph 4 probably means . possible 5. disused C. inaccessible D. unproductive Question 62: Which of the following is TRUE, according to the passage? A. In sutnSaharan African countries, productivity is boosted by tedmoiogy. In certain developed countries, mechanized farming is applied. .Ail small countries in Western Europe have high population densities. D. There is no connection between a country’s culture and overpopulation. Question 63: Which of the following is a contributor to overpopulation in many developing countries? A. High birth rates Emnomic rostrum: C. High-tech facilities Sufficient financial support Question 64: Which of the following could be the best title for the passage? High Birth Rate and its Consequences B. Poverty in Developing Countries Overpopuiation: A Worldwide Problem I). Overpopuiation: A Cause of Poverty Trang 5:15 — ms at till 532 SECTION B (2 points) I. finisneodmfa'tefwlawfny anaemia suck: my mtitmaanso‘ireJamu the sentence printedbei‘bmit. Wfimwmmmmwurmm Question 1: If Joh v ' - ,. he will be sacked soon. Unless I i. "I - Question 2: “Would you like to come to Heinvltad {QM gm film - . _ . Question 3: People believe t at this new teaching med-led is more ehedive th :‘ the old one. This new teaching method WM We Quostlon 4: He did not realize how difficult the task was untll he was halfiuay through it J’lflflflhfiw £th fiCu-Ql’rfiggb Question 5: It was wrong of you to Ieaxie the da‘ x wlthout asking for your teacher's permission . . . - .. igloo?! o9 [Ira/109x 21cm Tiqcfm 3 H. In about 140 wands. maparagmphabautofiebenefls ofmadflrybooks. Wflwm paragraph on your answer meet. The following prompts might be helpful in you. - Widening knowledge - Improving language ~ Relaxing -------- THE END —-—-—---- BAP AN 911 THI THPT QUOC GIA NM 2015 MéN: TIéNG ANI-I Mai :16: 532 w 10.C 16.A 22.B 28.B 34.C 40D 46.A 52.B 58.C 64D 11.C 17.3 23D 29D 3 > :4!" '60 15.A 21.0 27.A 33.C 39.D 45.A 41.13 47.0 53.C 59.A Phil: Viét‘ lai can 1. Unless John changes his walking style, he will be sacked soon. 2. He invited me to come to his 3.81h birthday. 3. This new teaching method is believed to be more effective than the old one. 4. Not until he was halfway through the task did he realize how difficult it was. 5. You should not have left the class without asking for your teacher’s permission. n. (1.5 aiém) Mfifidctiéuchidinhgii I-‘m ' -C5uch1‘a dé mach lac ‘ ‘ -Bécuchqp1yrar§ngphnhqpy§ucaucaadébai -136cuc uyén chuyéntirmébéidénkélluén 2. Phil Hi!!! I! - Pha't trién 3? c6 trinh m, 16 gig: _ -C6d5nchfing,vidu... dfifié béovéfi' kiéncflaminh —° - Sit dung ngén tit phi: hqp vé'i néi dulgg - Sir dung ngén til dimg v51} phong, 'thé loai - Sir dung til nail cho ba‘ni viél c6 5: uyén chuyén B 4. - - DI} lhuyet phuc ngu’b‘i doc -Dfid5nchfmg,vidu,lfipluén . -Dédfii:klfingnhiéuhunlm§cithonsfifizquydinh 155% Ngfipkép, dumbbhfi - Sf: dung dlnf‘g din can - Chfnh ti: vie! (hing chinh t5 +wcmnhaagayhiéunhanvsai lechysébitinh I 15mm 1%diém béi via) _ +Cl‘mg min 113i chinh 131, lgp di lip lgi chi tinh mét léi - Sir dgmg dying thi, the, c...
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