My-Father - My Fathers Tragedy by Carlos Bulosan(1914-1956...

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My Father’s Tragedy by Carlos Bulosan (1914-1956), a Filipino writer fighting for the American dream of the Filipinos on American soil while wrestling with tuberculosis, reminds me of relationships gone sour because of cockfighting. Oh, I have seen them...observed them...and, at this point, I’m still not sure if I like the activity at all. Do you? You see, a neighbor got three fighting cocks and his son, though grown and a father himself, is fast learning the trade. Both of them spend their Sundays grooming the animals than grooming their kids. A relative whose six-year old son is growing up in not-so-ideal (I’m being polite at best) surroundings is called a master of the cockpit because, at his young age, he knows how to pick up a cock without a hint of reluctance, memorizes the cockfighting terms like the back of his hand, and spends more time at the cockpit than at home playing with other children or learning his letters. A taxi driver whose vehicle I have ridden several nights ago kept grumbling over the loss of nine of his fighting cocks (and I was like, how in the world could he afford them? Cockfighting must be a terribly good business!) after these were allegedly stolen by his new neighbors who came from the slums. Such are some anecdotes of my life that caused me to raise an eyebrow each time I see a fighting cock (believe it or not, there are a lot of them all over the neighborhood!) or pass by a cockpit. What’s yours? Unsurprisingly, Bulosan’s My Father’s Tragedy garnered a similar automated response from me when I learned that the father in the story is into cock fighting; the title never hinted it at all! The story, written in first person, starts with a famine that drives farm-dependent families to poverty and hunger, including that of the narrator, a son. His mother and sister find ways and means to put food on the table. His father looks like a hopeless case, constantly exercising his fighting cock and dreaming his time away. Once, he even teaches the son how to make the animal stronger and ready for a fight. Then the father draws up a strategy that will put the family out of poverty. The build-up is so smartly done that after reading it, I did not quite know what hit me. The title of this short story hinted a tragedy, and there is, but you will have to found that out for yourself. A sonnet is fundamentally a dialectical construct which allows the poet to examine the nature and ramifications of two usually contrastive ideas, emotions, states of mind, beliefs, actions, events, images, etc., by juxtaposing the two against each other, and possibly resolving or just revealing the tensions created and operative between the two. O. K., so much for the fancy language. Basically, in a sonnet, you show two related but differing things to the reader in order to communicate something about them. Each of the three major types of sonnets accomplishes this in a somewhat different way.
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