Education in the Philippines - Education in the Philippines...

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Education in the Philippines From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Education in Philippines ) During the US colonial period, Education in the Philippines changed radically, modelled on the system of Education in the United States of the time. After the Second world war , changes in the US system were no longer automatically reflected in the Philippines, which has since moved in various directions of its own. Filipino children may enter public school at about age four, starting from Nursery up to Kindergarten . At about seven years of age, children enter elementary school (6 to 7 years). This may be followed by secondary school (4 years). Students may then sit for College Entrance Examinations (CEE), after which they may enter tertiary institutions (3 to 5 years). Other types of schools do exist, such as Private schools , Preparatory schools , International schools , Laboratory High Schools and Science High Schools . Several ethnic groups, including Chinese , British , Americans , and Japanese operate their own schools. Elementary schooling is compulsory, but 24% of Filipinos of the relevant age group do not attend, usually due to absence of any school in their area, or financial distress. Secondary schooling is recommended, but is not compulsory, and is of four years duration only. The school year in the Philippines starts in June of one year and ends in March of the next, with a two-month summer break for April and May, one week of semestral break (the last week of October), and a week or two of Christmas break. In 2005, the Philippines spent only about US$ 138 per pupil compared to US$ 1,582 in Singapore , US$ 3,728 in Japan , and US$ 852 in Thailand . [1] Concerning the standard of education in the Philippines, in June 2009 the president of FAAP cited the Congressional Commission on Education (EDCOM) lamenting 'a continuing decline in the quality of education in this country'. [2] He said this was due to four main factors: 'a) mismanagement of the educational system, b) not investing wisely in education, c) lack of management competencies, d) systemic corruption'. [3] Another reason why the Philippines is not a major supplier of tertiary education for overseas students in the region is because 3 semesters of each 8 semester bachelor degree are required to be completely devoted to government mandated subjects. These mandated subjects include the life and works of Filipino national hero Dr Jose Rizal, three subjects of Filipino language, and basic mathematics, science, and Filipino cultural subjects [4] more appropriate for senior high school than for tertiary level.
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History and development Earlier times Further information: Ancient Philippine scripts As early as in pre-Spanish times, education was informal, unstructured, and devoid of methods. Children were provided more vocational training and less academics (3 Rs) by their parents and in the houses of tribal tutors.
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