Brian Reader Response 1 - Brian Hade FSA103 Reader Response...

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Brian Hade 10/7/14 FSA103 Reader Response 1 Option 2 chapters 4, 14, 6, 7
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In the United States of America today, a college degree is what it takes to be successful. Chapters four, fourteen, six, and seven are all excellent examples of this that I am able to relate to them in one-way or another. Della Mae Justice has a story to success that reminds me so much of my mothers. Jeff Martinelli, from No Degree and No Way Back to the Middle, has an almost identical story to my aunts. And Andy Blevins, of The College Dropout Boom, talks about his decision to drop out of college and how it impacted his life is a story similar to my fathers. Lastly, Angela Whitikiers Climb. While I struggle to relate to this article in any way, Angela Whitiker’s story was so touching and inspiring. Each one of these chapters from Class Matters was relatable to something or someone in my life. My mother grew up in Harlem, New York. She was raised in a very tough neighborhood in a lower class home. Both her parents were immigrants from the Dominican Republic and to this day speak little English. Her brother was way older than her and joined the armed forces when she was still young. Even though Della Mae Justice didn’t grow up in a tough neighborhood, I feel that their two stories of success have a great amount of similarities. Starting with their parents. My mom was often dragged places in order to translate for her parents, which was like Della Mae Justice having to tend to her mentally ill mother. I relate the two situations because both of them were vital support systems to their parents, which I feel, must have created a level of maturity at a young age for the two of them. “Justice was always hungry for a taste of the world beyond the mountains” (Class Matters 130). My mother too always tells me that she “wanted
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out.” Now for the main reason as to why Della Mae Justice’s story on her road to getting out of her hometown reminded me so much of my mothers is because of how educated she became to do so. Della Mae Justice attended college and law
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  • Fall '11
  • X
  • History, Madrasah, The College Dropout, Andy Blevins, Della Mae Justice, Jeff Martinelli

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