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PPD WRITTEN REPORT by Kenneth F. Oquendo (2)

PPD WRITTEN REPORT by Kenneth F. Oquendo (2) - Republic of...

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Republic of the Philippines Polytechnic University of the Philippines College of Business Administration Department of Office Administration PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT UNIT VI Values and Image Improvement Topic: Your Self-Esteem How To Develop Assertiveness Submitted by: Kenneth F. Oquendo BSOA 2-1N June 28, 2016 Group IV
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Bachelor of Science in Office Administration YOUR SELF-ESTEEM I. Introduction What does self-esteem mean to you? You may think of it as your inner voice – the voice that tells you whether you are good enough to do or achieve something. Self-esteem is about how we value ourselves, our perceptions and beliefs in who we are and what we are capable of. Our self-esteem can be misaligned with other people's perception of who we are. II. History The term "self-esteem" was first coined by William James in 1890. One of the oldest concepts in psychology. James identified multiple dimensions of the self, with two levels of hierarchy: processes of knowing (called the 'I-self') and the resulting knowledge about the self (the `Me-self'). James’s (1890 as cited in Seligman, 1996, p.30) original formula of self-esteem is [Self-esteem = Success/ Pretensions] In the mid-1960s, sociologist Morris Rosenberg defined self-esteem as a feeling of self-worth and developed the Rosenberg self-esteem scale (RSES), which became the most-widely used scale to measure self-esteem in the social sciences. American psychologist Abraham Maslow included self-esteem in his hierarchy of human needs. Title: Personal and Professional Development Topic: Your Self-esteem
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Bachelor of Science in Office Administration III. Theories Many early theories suggested that self-esteem is a basic human need or motivation. Abraham Maslow included self-esteem in his hierarchy of human needs. He described two different forms of "esteem"; a) The need for respect from the other , in the form of recognition, success, and admiration. b) The need for self-respect , in the form of self-love, self-confidence, skill, or aptitude. Respect from others was believed to be more fragile and easily lost than inner self-esteem. According to Maslow, without the fulfillment of the self-esteem need, individuals will be driven to seek it and unable to grow and obtain self-actualization. Maslow also states that the healthiest expression of self-esteem is the one we take deserve from others. IV. Definitions Self-esteem is the subjective measure of a person's value—the worth that one believes one has as an individual. Psychologists since William James have attempted to define this self-appraisal in such as way as to measure it objectively, but with only mixed results. Low self-esteem has been implicated in bullying, although research suggests that people are more likely to use violence when they possess an unrealistically high self-esteem.
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  • Fall '16
  • office administration, Bachelor of Science in Office Administration

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