5 - Thermochemistry

5 - Thermochemistry - Click to edit Master subtitle style...

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Unformatted text preview: Click to edit Master subtitle style Thermochemistry Energy, heat: Uses and implications Energy Energy is actually like pornography: easy to recognize but hard to define. Energy is sometimes defined as the capacity to do work. Work is the result of a force acting over a distance. Some Types of Energy 1. Light 2. Gravitational 3. Potential 4. Kinetic/mechanical 5. Chemical 6. Electrical 7. Magnetic Heat – waste energy It’s not what you say, it’s what you do… Often easier to see the effects of energy than the energy itself… One of the easiest things to understand (especially during a Rochester winter) is “heat”. Heat Heat is actually waste energy from an engineering standpoint. It is energy that doesn’t go into making the car move, or bonding the atoms together. Heat simply raises the temperature of materials. On the molecular level, it is energy that makes the molecules move around faster. Kinetic Theory of Temperature Within this model, “temperature” is actually a measure of the median kinetic energy of the molecules. # of molecules Energy of molecules Median K.E. T Absolute vs. Relative Temperature Kinetic Energy is energy of motion. The faster a given object travels, the more KE it has. # of molecules Energy of molecules Median K.E. T Low temp High Temp Absolute vs. Relative Temperature Fahrenheit, Celsius, Kelvin All different temperature scales. You could define your own. Find two temperatures (body temperature, melting point of sugar), divide up the difference between them into arbitrary units and you’re done! Absolute vs. Relative Temperature Fahrenheit, Celsius were made just that way – picking two arbitrary temperatures and dividing the difference between them into arbitrary units. These are “relative” temperature scales. Relative scales work fine: higher temperature is “hotter”, lower temperature is “colder” Absolute vs. Relative Temperature But if Temperature is really to be defined as the KE of the molecules, 0 degrees should be the temperature at which ALL MOLECULES STOP MOVING!...
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course CHEM 1011.216.0 taught by Professor Joelanzafame during the Winter '07 term at RIT.

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5 - Thermochemistry - Click to edit Master subtitle style...

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