EndMiddleAges

EndMiddleAges - Medieval Technology And and end to the...

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Medieval Technology And and end to the Middle Ages? Textile Manufacturing Largest industry - widespread 11th c. specialization in Flanders, N. France, Belgium Other important centers Tuscany, S.E. England, S. France Wool - by far the most varied and widespread Linen in France and Eastern Europe Silk and Cotton in Italy and Muslim Spain Guild System in Cities for skilled workers Dyers, fullers, shearers, some weavers Northern Europe - “Putting Out System” New Technology in Textiles Pedal Loom ( as opposed to weaving frame) Spinning Wheel (as opposed to distaff) Water Powered Fulling Mill Metallurgical Industries More accessible iron ore and fuel than in Roman Times Use of water power to work bellows and large trip hammers Early 14th c. early precursors to blast furnace Impact of free labor as opposed to slaves Why is this so crucial? Are there any cases where slaves are more efficient?
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2009 for the course ECON 4514 taught by Professor Shuie during the Spring '08 term at Colorado.

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EndMiddleAges - Medieval Technology And and end to the...

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