hmwk12ans - SO 2 has a dipole moment, CO 2 doesnt. Remember...

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Chapter 12
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4. (1 point) This one wasn’t always trivial…so the argument is perhaps more important that the answers. On a and c the best answer is “it’s not obvious”. In part a, the question is how to weigh the differences between dipole moments and, which both molecules have (but whose direction and magnitude isn’t obvious) and the increases in London forces as we pass from fluorine to chlorine. In PF 3 the dipole moment has magnitude 1.03 D; in PCl 3 , 0.97 D. The two compounds boil at nearly the same temperature; the fluoride at -101 C; the chloride at -112 C. Part b: sort of a trick question. CO 2 isn’t a liquid at ordinary pressures; at pressures above about 5 atm it does boil, at -56C. SO 2 does boil at ordinary pressures, at -10 C. The difference that makes a difference?
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Unformatted text preview: SO 2 has a dipole moment, CO 2 doesnt. Remember to check the geometries. Part c; again, not obvious. Is there a dipole moment? Not in AsF 5 , due to the symmetry of the molecule; yes in AsF 3 . They boil at similar temperatures, -53C (the pentafluoride) and -63C (the trifluoride). Part d: H 2 S boils at -61C; H 2 O at 100C. The difference? Hydrogen bonding. Part e: KBr boils, if you can call it that, at 1436C; CH 3 Br at 4C. The salt has ionic bonds, so there are equally strong interactions in most directions; CH 3 Br has almost no dipole moment and only London forces holding it together as a liquid. Part f: No dipole moments in either case; the whole difference is the London force. Methane boils at -184C, silane at -112C....
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hmwk12ans - SO 2 has a dipole moment, CO 2 doesnt. Remember...

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