article #5 - Cory LAI 350F Article #5 Grading Thomas...

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Unformatted text preview: Cory LAI 350F Article #5 Grading Thomas Guskeys article may have been one of the most surprising articles Ive read thus far. Not because the information itself was surprising, but because of the road it has taken to get here and the complexity such a simple thing like grading takes on when its dissected. Its hard to deny that grading is an integral part of education and deserves the importance assigned to it. The recommendation that most surprised me in this article was the third bullet of the agreement section. It states that no matter what method of grading is used, grading and reporting remain inherently subjective. I guess it surprised me because I happen to be a very analytical thinker; my feeling is that with the right method objectivity can always be obtained and that subjectivity is only the result of a flaw in the method. To say that my feelings will interfere with my grading is only true if I fail when I establish my grading scheme. Of course I say this from the view of a perspective science teacher where objectivity is possible. I think for an art teacher say this from the view of a perspective science teacher where objectivity is possible....
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2009 for the course LAI 350 taught by Professor Ginsburg during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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article #5 - Cory LAI 350F Article #5 Grading Thomas...

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