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Olivia Medina Instructor Paul Acosta English MO1B16 March 2015Aesthetics in Poetry People, in their own way, define what beauty is in nature, in material possessions and in human actions. It is a compilation of pleasing ideas pulledfrom unique experiences and sights. No two people will exactly match an opinion on what is beautiful; what one specifically takes from beauty may widely differentiate from another. Sharon Olds in “Sex without Love” finds beauty in sex as a slow-building art and as the product of love while Andrew Marvell, in “To His Coy Mistress,” is aesthetically enthused by the spontaneous act of sex as a product of fleeting time. Both poems contrast in their deep meaning of sexual action. This is to say, Olds finds beauty in the meaning of sex and on the contrary, Marvell finds beauty in the action. Nevertheless, both poets illustrate the beauty in time, love, and sex. Many women and men alike do not wait for the commitment of love to have sex as is sensibly traditional. Olds glorifies sex as the only form of expression of love between two people. The action of sex without love is seemingly destroying a masterpiece of art. “How do they do it, the ones who make love/ without love? Beautiful as dancers,/ gliding over each other like ice-skaters/over the ice” (LL. 1-4). The art involved in lovemaking as portrayed by Olds is beautiful. She connects the beauty of sex to that of
Medinagraceful dancer this comparison of love making to dancers makes sex appeargraceful and poised as if beauty is in the rhythms involved and the caresses and moaning of both partners. Olds describes the outward appearance of sexin action in comparisons that are descriptive and beautiful. Her image of dancers and ice-skaters define the complexity and time that should rightfullytake place in such an action. “How do they come to the/ come to the come tothe God come to the/ still waters, and not love/ the one who came there with them” What is exemplified here is her wonderment at the idea of the beauty of sex without love as the motive force. Her way of stylizing the poem with these gaps between phrases act much like the shortness of breath in an orgasm. “How do they come?” bluntly meaning, how are two loveless beings able to climax without loving one another? And how do they complete the action, the still water, without feeling as one in the end? The God she

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