Section 3 Anthropology Notes

Section 3 Anthropology Notes - Section Three Anthropology...

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Unformatted text preview: Section Three Anthropology Notes 10/29/07 Movie Strangers Abroad, Off the Veranda Trobirand islanders o Economic exchange is mainly male o Arm shells and necklaces = money Kula o Exchange involved no ordinary presents and was between special friends o Kula = to go o Last exercise following elaborate and dangerous expeditions o Arm shells cant be bought or sold special items of exchange o Ritual involving a ring of islands forming a closed circuit Clockwise long necklaces of red shell Counter bracelets of white shell o Begins with building of Kula canoe Never carries food, for a chief o Focus of each trip is the handing over of each necklace/arm shell o Each voyager heading to village of Kula partner until given his object o Most people have to offer special objects to chief, or else its considered a challenge o Good way to reinforce social and political alliances Male/female economic exchange Movie The Triobriand Islanders of Papua New Guinea Bundles and skirts Women and wealth, money and power Giving is more important to receiving Yam harvest = holiday, rivalry, competition, tradition Bundles of leaves are womens wealth (valuable and in demand because it takes a lot of time and effort to make them) Matrilineal system Hereditary chiefs hold power over everyone but women have economic power o Bundles underpin mens power o Sons can never inherit fathers chief titles o Instead, sisters sons The more wives, the more yams, and the richer/more powerful you are Men are responsible for growing yams, but women work in the gardens too o Women also create their own wealth: bundles and skirts Competition with yams between men Bundles in funeral rites 10/31/07: Ongkas Big Moka Big men give away thins for status Competitive feasting Papua new guinea: tribe Kalweka Ongka K leader/big man o He and his tribe assembling a gift for 5 years Big man to receive gift: Perowa, also a big member of the National Assembly in Papua new Guinea Moku (gifts) most important part of Highlanders lives Gift = 500-00 pigs, birds, truck, money 0 could be biggest gift ever given o Would give him and his tribe status Big men dont have authority over tribesmen, only power of persuasion Tribe of 1000 people farm, raise livestock No villages, just scattered settlements Big men compete for status of fixing the date Ongka: four wives, nine children Money looks after white people, pigs look after Kalweka Rare bird- Kasseri captured for sole purpose of Moka Basic food of pigs and people: sweet potatoes Can survive without pigs, but if want to get ahead or marry, you definitely need them...
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Section 3 Anthropology Notes - Section Three Anthropology...

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