Integrating_Quotes - The Writing Center 6171 H. C. White...

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The Writing Center6171 H. C. White HallUW-MadisonIntegrating Quotations from a Literary Textinto a Literary Analysis PaperAs you choose quotations for a literary analysis, remember the purposeof quoting.Your paper develops anargument about what the author of the text is doing--how the text "works."You use quotations to support thisargument; that is, you select, present, and discuss material from the text specifically to "prove" your point--tomake your case--in much the same way a lawyer brings evidence before a jury.Quoting for any other purpose is counterproductive.Don't quoteto "tell the story" or otherwise conveybasic information about the text; assume the reader knows the text.Don't quotejust for the sake of quoting orjust to fill up space.Don't make the reader jump up and shout "Irrelevant!"This handout presents (1) general guidelines about the use of quotations in a literary analysis;(2) suggestions about ways to combine quoted material with your own prose; (3) "nuts and bolts" informationabout format and various rules for handling text.We Know What Shakespeare Wrote--We Don't Know How You Read ItThe following paragraph is from a student's analysis of the relationship between two characters in Woolf'sTo the Lighthouse.Notice how statements expressing the writer's ideas and observations are verified withevidence from the novel in both summarized and quoted form.We learn about Mrs. Ramsey's personality by observing her feelings about othercharacters.For example, Mrs. Ramsey has mixed feelings toward Mr. Tansley, but herfeelings seem to grow more positive over time as she comes to know him better.At firstMrs. Ramsey finds Mr. Tansley annoying, as shown especially when he mentions that noone is going to the lighthouse (52).But rather than hating him, at this point she feels pity:"she pitied men always as if they lacked something . . ." (85).Then later, during thegathering, pity turns to empathy as she realizes that Mr. Tansley must feel inferior.Hemust know, Mrs. Ramsey thinks, that "no woman would look at him with Paul Rayley inthe room" (106).Finally, by the end of the dinner scene, she feels some attraction to Mr.Tansley and also a new respect: "She liked his laugh. . . .She liked his awkwardness.There was a lot in that man after all" (110).In observing this evolution in her attitude, welearn more about Mrs. Ramsey than we do about Mr. Tansley.The change in Mrs.

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Term
Summer
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Tags
Sociology, The Great Gatsby, To the Lighthouse, Quotation mark, Mrs Ramsey

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