Humanities Lecture 2.24

Humanities Lecture 2.24 - Humanities Lecture: 2.24 The...

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Humanities Lecture: 2.24 The Oedipus Story I. What This Play is Not About A. Character Flaw 1. Aristotle on Hannartia (a mistake/error of judgment) 2. Oedipus’s Character: Vice or Virtue? 3. Does the Punishment Fit the Crime? 4. Predestination a) “A man’s character is his destiny” 5. Traits regarded as his “character flaws” wouldn’t have been regarded as  character flaws by ancient Athenians a) Society valued: self-importance, ability to defend self, ability to fail  your enemies’ plots, pride 6. If they were character flaws, punishment doesn’t fit the crime 7. Oedipus is destined before his birth to do what he does a) Oedipus is banned (punished) for his crime B. Fate vs. Free Will 1. Struggle between individual and greater destiny 2. Identity as Fate a) He struggles against his own identity b) Its his ignorance of his own identity that Tiresias taunts at him 3. Already too late a) The bad stuff already happened when Sophocles begins the play
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This note was uploaded on 04/22/2008 for the course HUM 1 taught by Professor Cox during the Winter '08 term at UCSD.

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Humanities Lecture 2.24 - Humanities Lecture: 2.24 The...

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