Essay 2 Descartes

Essay 2 Descartes - Matthew Saunders 260230561 Philosophy...

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Matthew Saunders 260230561 Philosophy 200A Essay # 2 In Descartes’ Meditations, he adopts a criterion of truth. This says that something that can be perceived clearly and distinctly must be true. He justifies this through a variety of arguments, of which some are stronger and some are weaker, and one leads to the famous Cartesian Circle. Descartes’ first justification for his criterion of truth is that he knows that he exists, because although he can doubt everything else, he cannot doubt himself, as something has to exist to do the doubting. He can perceive this clearly and distinctly, and knows that it is true that he exists. He has also never perceived anything clearly and distinctly that has later been proven false. Therefore he can assume that anything he can perceive clearly and distinctly is true. However, I feel that he should not extrapolate from this that everything he can perceive clearly and distinctly is true, as he is still susceptible to deceptions, which could be brought upon him by a
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This note was uploaded on 04/22/2008 for the course PHIL 200 taught by Professor Mccall during the Fall '08 term at McGill.

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Essay 2 Descartes - Matthew Saunders 260230561 Philosophy...

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