(Week 3) Schelling - The Diplomacy of Violence

(Week 3) Schelling - The Diplomacy of Violence - Week 3 The...

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Week 3 The Diplomacy of Violence Thomas Schelling Distinction between diplomacy and force is the relation between adversaries. Diplomacy is bargaining; each party somehow controls what the other wants and can get more by compromise. “Whether polite or impolite, constructive or aggressive, respectful or vicious, whether it occurs among friends or antagonists and whether or not there is a basis for trust and goodwill, there must be some common interest, if only in the avoidance of mutual damage, and an awareness of the need to make the other party prefer an outcome acceptable to oneself.” There is no need to bargain when there is enough military force. “In addition to taking and protecting things of value, it can destroy value.” Powers can hurt and cause pain and suffering. The Contrast of Brute Force with Coercion Difference between defense and deterrence, between brute force and intimidation, between conquest and blackmail, between action and quests. The difference between “unilateral ‘un-diplomatic’ recourse to forcible action and coercive diplomacy based on the power to hurt.” Military, un-diplomatic recourse: concerned with enemy strength, not enemy interests (measured in comparable
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(Week 3) Schelling - The Diplomacy of Violence - Week 3 The...

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