The Cranes Final Paper

The Cranes Final Paper - The Cranes are Flying The Remake...

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The Cranes are Flying The Remake Jonathan Rose Russian Film 11/31/07 Dr. Harrison
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The Cranes are Flying Mikhail Kalatozov’s film is a black and white masterpiece that tells a sad story of love lost, but makes you long for a new beginning with the hope that springs up in you as you watch the yearning Tatiana Samoilova play the heroine. She loses her love and marries the brother of the man she loves, but she is not judged by her fellow Russians, minus the speech by her father in law at the hospital and the reservations of his nurse assistant, she is still mourned in her loss of love and we hope that she will pull through. When The Cranes are Flying first screened before audiences at the Mosfilm Festival in 1957 in late summer it was an immediate triumph of cinema and as it made its way to the Cannes Film Festival in 1958 it only picked up more steam as it collected accolades on its way to the big dance. At Cannes, the film picked up the biggest award, the coveted Palm de’ Ore or Golden Palm award for the Best Film of the year. And within a year Cranes was a landmark film to be reckoned with and everyone was jumping on the bandwagon as the praise kept coming (Woll 73). The star actress who played the heroine Veronika, Tatiana Samoilova , entranced the paparazzi and foreign press agents, when she came out into the hallway, directly preceding the film’s showing, the photographers cheered and clapped for her instead of doing their job and taking her picture for their respective magazines and newspapers. Stardom cam upon her and rushed in, one man at an East Germany film festival put it into words perfectly what audiences near and far were feeling. He said, “At long last we see on the Soviet screen not a mask but a face, most important of all in today’s world” (Woll 73). What he said was right on and it was true that this film struck a chord in the Soviet people’s hearts. It was the first blockbuster film following The Thaw in Russia and a Post-Stalinism film that tried to tell and show the Russian people as individuals trying to exist while the Soviet system and the war machine keeps forcing its way into the family life of a particular family. The family is shown as separate from the Soviet system, but they can’t be separate because war is knocking on the door and bombs are caving it in
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and the draft is impending doom and immanent like the wolf at the door that can’t be shooed away. The original film is shot in black and white and took advantage of new film techniques. New for the time, things like the use of “perpetual motion” caught on the camera with the use of an employed handheld camera that the cinematographer used during key scenes of war and street scenes. The brilliant camera work and use of creative angles took advantage of catching newly sought curvatures and the use of shade and light to draw you is something that should be taught. New optics like the short-focus was effective in catching the faces of the actors and their movements up close and made you
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This note was uploaded on 04/22/2008 for the course RUSS 3391 taught by Professor Harrison during the Fall '07 term at UT Arlington.

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The Cranes Final Paper - The Cranes are Flying The Remake...

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