Laboratory 4 - Laboratory 4: Anaerobic Power David Jones...

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Unformatted text preview: Laboratory 4: Anaerobic Power David Jones February 28, 2008 I N TRODUCT ION: All athletic events require the generation of some power. Power can be defined as work/time or force X distance. Short bursts of power like linemen exploding off the line of scrimmage or the shot put throw, are maximal power output generated in a very short period of time. Marathons however are spread out periods of power, spread out over long periods of time. Even activities like 100-, and 200-m dashes require very high levels of power output. Many testing procedures can be performed to measure power, some are used to primarily measure plyometric power and exploding power like the vertical jump, or long jump. Some tests are also used to measure longevity of power, but these tests are measured over a period of 30 seconds or longer. Theoretically, all anaerobic power tests are designed to measure the ability to produce energy with the ATP-PC system and anaerobic glycolysis. ME T HODS: Data collected in this study was obtained by means of the Wingate Anaerobic test and the anaerobic step test. The Wingate Test is considered to be the gold standard for measuring anaerobic power much like underwater weighing is considered the gold standard for body composition. The Wingate test is simple, inexpensive, reliable, valid, and requires little equipment. Wingate Test 1. Measure subjects body weight to the nearest 0.25 kg and record it on the data collection form. 2. Determine the resistance setting to be used for the test by multiplying the subjects bodyweight (kg) by 0.075. Round the resistance setting to the nearest 0.25 kg. 3. Adjust the seat height for the cycle ergometer so that it is approximately at the level of the hips. 4. Have subject perform a two minute warm-up in which he/she cycles against a very light resistance. During this time, instruct the subject to perform 2-3, 3 to 5 secind speed bursts to warm up. 5. At the end of the warm-up, instruct the subject that a countdown will be started by a timer on the computer. When countdown reached 3-2-1, the subject must pedal as hard and as fast as possible. When this happens the administer adjusts the resistance on the cycle ergometer....
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This lab report was uploaded on 04/22/2008 for the course HES 4833 taught by Professor Dr.k during the Spring '08 term at The University of Oklahoma.

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Laboratory 4 - Laboratory 4: Anaerobic Power David Jones...

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