Laboratory 3 - Laboratory 3 Predicting Maximal Oxygen...

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Laboratory 3: Predicting Maximal Oxygen Consumption Rate David Jones February 19, 2008
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INTRODUCTION: Submaximal tests can be your best friend or your worst enemy. These test have several advantages and disadvantages that make them better than some maximal test, but worst than others. One advantage of a sub-maximal test is it reduces the chance of heart attack or heart problems, especially for older subjects. These test are almost always used with elderly individuals in order to assess their health. Maximal tests are more often used on younger individuals because they can handle the stress on their body and also by not taking a subject to their actual max level, then we may not know an accurate value of one’s endurance. By these tests being shorter and more manageable it also allows for the completion of many subjects at a faster pace. The accuracy of these sub-maximal tests is about ± 10%, depending on the method used. These test are more appropriately used for clinical screening purposes and should not be used for long term training studies. PRUPOSE: The Purpose of this laboratory experience is to acquaint students with different methods for estimating VO2max, and to see how these predictions compare to the VO2max values obtained during Lab 2. METHODS:
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Submaximal Treadmill Test The process of this test involves a brisk to fast walking pace ranging for 3.0 – 4.5 mph and eliciting a heart rate between 50-70% of the age-predicted maximum which should be established during a 4-minute warm-up at 0% grade. If the heart rate is not above 100bpm by the end of the 4-minute warm-up then continue for another minute. This was then followed by another 4-minunte exercise bout in attempt to raise the HR above 100bpm. Once the HR is above 100bpm continue with an additional 4-minute exercise bout, but increase
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This lab report was uploaded on 04/22/2008 for the course HES 4833 taught by Professor Dr.k during the Spring '08 term at The University of Oklahoma.

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Laboratory 3 - Laboratory 3 Predicting Maximal Oxygen...

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