po37lab02 - VOLUME VII THE FALL VEGETABLE GARDEN AUGUST...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
V OLUME  VII            A UGUST  2005 F T HE  F ALL  V EGETABLE  G ARDEN all is a time for endings, the time when the  natural world winds down in preparation for a  long winter's rest. But fall doesn't have to mean  the end your vegetable garden — if you choose  your plants carefully and use a few savvy  gardener's tricks.  Your fall garden can include any healthy  warm weather crops from your summer garden  that are still producing well — tomatoes,  peppers, cucumbers, and corn, for example.  Fall is also an excellent time to reseed or  transplant cool weather crops such as lettuce,  spinach, peas, and plants in the cabbage family,  because they will grow better and taste sweeter  in the shorter, sunny days and cool nights.  You won't have problems with  finicky plants bolting to seed  because of the heat.  In the cold winter areas a  first  frost is often followed by several weeks of nice  weather, so it makes sense to try to extend the  gardening season.  Using a cold frame, plastic  tunnel, or floating row cover will allow you to  push the cold weather crops' season much  farther toward winter.  Root crops such as beets, carrots, and  parsnips can be left in well-mulched ground  after the tops die back, to be harvested all  winter.  Like other cool weather crops, they taste  sweeter later in the year.  In the warm weather areas, fall is a great  time to grow the heat-sensitive crops that  summer would burn to a crisp, and to rejuvenate  or replant some of the flagging heat-lovers for a  second harvest as well. In warmer climates, 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This homework help was uploaded on 09/18/2007 for the course BEE 102 taught by Professor Hillman,p. during the Fall '05 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

  • Fall '05
  • HILLMAN,P.
  • Parsley, worldrenowned Longwood Gardens, weather crops, cool weather crops, industrialist Pierre S., S. du Pont

Page1 / 6

po37lab02 - VOLUME VII THE FALL VEGETABLE GARDEN AUGUST...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online