Lecture1-Introduction

Lecture1-Introduction - Thermodynamics Today: Introduction...

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Lecture 1: Introduction to Separations 1 Thermodynamics Today: Introduction to Separations Lecture 2: Review of equilibrium thermodynamics (not covered in class). Lecture 3: Thermodynamics of Separations Instructor: Charles Musgrave 261 Keck 725-9176 charles@chemeng.stanford.edu http://chemeng.stanford.edu/~charles/cheme120/ Office Hour: Tuesday 3-4pm TA: Junsic Hong 03 Stauffer I 723-0980 junsic@stanford.edu Office hour: Thursday 4-5pm Book: Separation Process Principles Seader and Henley Homework Assigned on Friday/Due on Friday
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Lecture 1: Introduction to Separations 2 Introduction to Separations To do this we must cause differential transport of species or conversion of species so that the purer mixtures can be collected. Most separations processes involve differential transport. However, mixing is inherent in nature: The increase in entropy associated with the randomness of a mixture lowers the Gibbs free energy. Therefore, to “unmix” a solution we must overcome the entropic driving force to mix. mixed separated Examples: Separation of blood Purification of drugs Purification of Au, Si, GaAs Refining of crude oil DNA testing Purification of organics Purification of water Smog control The goal of a separations process is to purify solutions.
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Lecture 1: Introduction to Separations 3 Why Separate? There are many reasons for wanting pure substances. Some of these reasons include: • Need for pure material in engineering application (semiconductors) • Preparation of raw materials into their components • Need for pure material for materials processing • Need to remove toxins or inactive components from solution (drugs) • Need for ultrapure samples for testing • Need for analysis of the components of the mixture (DNA testing) Based on these motivations for separations, we can divide separations up into three main areas:
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course CHEMENG 120 taught by Professor Musgrave during the Spring '04 term at Stanford.

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Lecture1-Introduction - Thermodynamics Today: Introduction...

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