CST8174_Lecture_3_Power_Supply

CST8174_Lecture_3_Power_Supply - Algonquin College CST8174...

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Algonquin College CST8174 CST8174 Computer Technology Basics Power Supply
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Friday, August 29, 2008 10 - 2 Algonquin College CST8174 Power Supply The power supply is one of the most important parts in the PC It is also often the most overlooked When a manufacturer is trying to create an economic system where do they skimp It’s the power supply Let’s start off with a little background of electricity and what is does
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Friday, August 29, 2008 10 - 3 Algonquin College CST8174 Electricity Electricity is the flow of negatively charged particles called electrons through matter All matter allows the flow of electrons to varying degrees A material that allows electrons to flow freely is called a conductor Metallic wire is an excellent conductor
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Friday, August 29, 2008 10 - 4 Algonquin College CST8174 Electricity The are two basic measurements that apply to the flow of electrons Current Measures the number of electrons moving past a certain point on a wire at a given time Measured in units of amperes or amps for short Voltage The pressure of the electrons flowing through the wire or conductor Measured in units of volts
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Friday, August 29, 2008 10 - 5 Algonquin College CST8174 Electricity Electricity comes in two different varieties Direct Current (DC) Electrons flow in one direction only around a continuous circuit What you PC uses Alternative Current (AC) The flow of electrons alternate direction periodically within a circuit What is available from your local power company
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Friday, August 29, 2008 10 - 6 Algonquin College CST8174 AC Power Much more efficient than DC current for traveling long distances Most electrical devices use AC than DC The frequency in which the current alternates direction is called cycles per second This is measured in hertz (Hz) A standard electrical outlet in North America is 120V and 60Hz
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Friday, August 29, 2008 10 - 7 Algonquin College CST8174 Electrical Outlet
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Friday, August 29, 2008 10 - 8 Algonquin College CST8174 AC Power The three prong outlet: Hot Smaller rectangular hole Neutral Larger rectangular hole Ground Small round hole Together the hot and neutral wires supply the path needed by alternating current
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Friday, August 29, 2008 10 - 9 Algonquin College CST8174 Power Supply Basics Now we have a very basic understanding of electricity as it applies to your home The power supply in your computer doesn’t actually supply the power Your local power company supplies the power So you may be wondering what the power supply actually does
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10 - 10 Algonquin College CST8174 Power Supply Basics Converts the high-voltage AC to lower voltage DC power There are three voltages your computer uses: 3.3V Onboard electronics 5V Onboard electronics -5V Serial mouse 12V Devices with motors such as hard drives and CD-ROMs
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CST8174_Lecture_3_Power_Supply - Algonquin College CST8174...

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