Chapter1.History of Astronomy

Chapter1.History of Astronomy - History of Astronomy...

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1 History of Astronomy Chapter 1
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2 Ancient Astronomy astrology navigation calendar → the “geocentric” perspective
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7 A(moon) = ½ o
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8 Stonehenge - England
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10 Celestial Sphere
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11 The Celestial Sphere zenith horizon poles (N and S celestial poles) celestial equator circumpolar zones → Latitude = altitude of N.C.P.
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12 Leo Cygnus Constellations Constellations are groupings of stars. There are 88. --- asterisms (Big Dipper)
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14 Rising and setting movements of Sun Rising and setting movements of Sun day year celestial equator – extrapolation of Earth’s equator onto celestial sphere Ecliptic : planets, Zodiac Solstices and equinoxes
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17 The Seasons Summer Winter The Earth is closest to the Sun in the first week of January, farthest during first week in July.
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18 Why is it hotter in July than in January? (in Northern Hemisphere) more direct heating more hours of daylight
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22 Retrograde Motion
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