Classical Conditioning - information about the occurrence...

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Classical Conditioning Through classical conditioning, organisms learn about the signaling properties of events .
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Components Unconditioned Stimulus UCS Conditioned Stimulus CS Unconditioned Response UCR Conditioned Response CR Tip: think about conditioned and unconditioned as trained and untrained.
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Pavlov’s Dogs Food Bell Salivation UCS UCR Salivation First neutral then CS CR
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Video of Pavlovs’ Dogs QuickTime™ and a Cinepak decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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Establishing a connection Conditioned stimulus needs to be presented before the unconditioned stimulus. Why doesn’t simultaneous or backward conditioning work?
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Establishing a connection CS needs to be presented before the UCS. UCS needs to follow CS close in time. UCS needs to be reliably preceded by the CS Blocking demonstrates that a CS needs to provide new
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Unformatted text preview: information about the occurrence of UCS. Aspects of Classical Conditioning Stimulus Generalization Stimulus Discrimination Extinction Spontaneous Recovery Stimulus Generalization When a new stimulus produces a response similar to the one produced by the conditioned stimulus. Example: Little Albert Stimulus Discrimination When a new stimulus produces a response different from the one produced by the conditioned stimulus. Example: Little Albert Extinction When a conditioned stimulus (CS) is presented several times without being followed by the unconditioned stimulus (UCS). Participant learns that the CS is no longer a signal. Spontaneous Recovery Recovery of an extinguished response after a period of nonexposure to the conditioned stimulus....
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Classical Conditioning - information about the occurrence...

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