POLS_110_-_Lecture_24

POLS_110_-_Lecture_24 - Yet another insight brought to you...

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Chapter 14 (cont’d): THE COURTS
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The Relationship Between Civil Rights and Civil Liberties: From 1937 until very recently the Supreme Court primarily concerned itself with civil rights and civil liberties. “Civil Rights” and “Civil Liberties” not interchangeable. Often court cases occur at the point of conflict between Rights and Liberties Usually the one with more power is making a Liberties claim (gov’t stay away), whereas the one with less power is making a rights claim.
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Civil Liberties: Freedoms from government Protection from/against government Those freedoms listed in the Bill of Rights Essentially, the right to do what you want to do. Image courtesy of battellemedia; http:// battellemedia.com/images/Civil_Liberties.jpg
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Civil Rights: Ensuring Access to Liberties These may be Claims on government itself Or they may be demands that government get involved and protect you from your employer, organizations, … etc. Essentially, government protection for doing what you want to do. We’ll discuss these more in two class sessions! Image courtesy of art.com
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Civil Liberties in the Constitution: Civil liberties are constitutional provisions, laws, and practices that protect individuals from governmental interference. Constitutional liberties The original Constitution specifically protected only a few liberties from the national government and almost none from state governments. The safeguard against tyranny that the framers preferred was to give the national government little power with which to attack individual liberties.
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The Constitution only outlined a few crucial freedoms: Prohibition against suspending the writ of habeas corpus except when public safety demanded it due to rebellion or invasion Prohibition against passing bills of attainder Prohibition against passing ex post facto laws Objections to the absence of a more specific listing led
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course POL unk taught by Professor R.smith during the Spring '08 term at DePauw.

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POLS_110_-_Lecture_24 - Yet another insight brought to you...

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