POLS_110_-_Lecture_27

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Chapter 16 (cont’d): CIVIL RIGHTS: THE STRUGGLE FOR POLITICAL EQUALITY
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Remedying Past Wrongs: The primary pursuit of remedying past violations of civil rights in the US have been through Affirmative Action Programs. Origins of Affirmative Action: Despite new legislation and changed public attitudes as a result of the Civil Rights movement, the economic and social situations of African Americans were little improved. Prominent figures such as Martin Luther King, Jr. became convinced that a broader societal effort was needed to eradicate poverty. Image courtesy of loc.gov
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Affirmative Action: Origins After MLK’s assassination, many began to support the idea that racial progress required racial preferences for hiring, contracts, and college admissions. Interestingly, Richard Nixon took the most important step in this direction. Philadelphia Plan (1969) Regents v. Bakke (1978) prohibited the use of racial quotas by university admissions committees but later permitted the use of race as a factor in hiring or admissions Since then, government and higher education racial preference programs have become relatively permanent However, their aim has shifted from providing remedies for past discrimination to enhancing diversity
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POLS_110_-_Lecture_27 - Yet another insight brought to you...

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