EPSC200-2

EPSC200-2 - STUDENT NAME: STUDENT NUMBER: COURSE SECTION:...

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Unformatted text preview: STUDENT NAME: STUDENT NUMBER: COURSE SECTION: El 01 LEACOCK 132 El 02 OTTO MAASS 112 MCGill E22233: Facung of Science Earth and Planetar Sciences EPSC 200 Terrestrial Planets Winter 2007 Examiner: Professor Olivia Jensen Date: April 18, 2007 Associate Examiner: Professor Jeanne Paquette Time: 9h00—12h00 Instructions: The examination comprises three Parts and 15 Pages including this cover page. Part I: The 60 multiple choice questions of Part I of the exam must be answered on the computer coding sheets, in pencil. Make sure that your student ID# is correctly entered into the bubbles on the upper left side of your sheet. There are 4 versions of this examination. Make sure that the version number appropriate to Part I of this exam is entered in the column designated “Version” on the computer answer sheet. The_Examination Security Monitor Program detects pairs of students with unusually similar answer patterns on multiple-choice exams. Data generated by this program can be used as admissible evidence, either to initiate or corroborate an investigation or a charge of cheating under Section 16 of the Code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Procedures. Part II: All questions must be answered directly on the examination paper within the restricted area of the boxes. You may use the blank backsides of pages in this I examination paper to compose your answers but the answers must be transcribed into the boxes provided. Part III: This section comprises the traditional “association question” and your personal opinion statement. Answer on the examination paper directly. No explanation of any question asked on this exam can be given during the exam; there are just too many students writing the exam to provide each of you with individual explanations. If you have reason to question the clarity of any question asked, note I your concern briefly in the margin; we may consider your objection during grading of the question. The contribution to the final grade for each question in this examination is noted in square brackets after the question. This examination counts for a total of 65% toward the final course grade: that is, 65 marks. Your midterm and/or term paper contribute the other 35%. 0 You are not permitted to use calculators that have text-memory capabilities. 0 You are not permitted to use notes or any reference materials. 0 You may use a basic translation dictionary; i.e, one without technical explanations. o The examination paper must be returned for grading. The examination comprises 15 pages counting this cover page. There are 60 multiple choice questions in Part I, 10 short answer questions in Part II and 2 questions in Part ' III. Please ensure that your name and student registration number and section are inscribed at the tag 0: each and every gageS especiallg garts II and III of this examination paper and that your student ID# is properly inscribed onto the computer gradin sheet Terrestrial Planets EPSC 200 Winter 2007 Final Examination Section: Cl 01 Leacock 132 Student Name: U 02 Otto Maass 112 Student Number: This section comprises 60 multiple-choice questions. Each question is worth 1/2 mark. Indicate your answer directly on this sheet by filling in the appropriate “O”0pen circle on the computer grading (Scantron) sheet. Make sure that you have properly filled in your student ID# and the version number of the exam on the grading sheet. [30 marks] This is Version I l. About 70% of all earthquakes occur along the subduction zones. About 10% occur within the interior of tectonic plates well away from plate margins. Most of the remainder occur where lithospheric plates are either separating or slipping past each other. where bubbles rising through Earth's mantle break through the crust. at the boundary between the Earth's mantle and core. where impacts caused by asteroids and large meteoroids have weakened the crust. in the most populated regions of Asia, the Middle East and North Africa. .U‘F‘E’JN.” 2. We have, since the Apollo astronauts installed laser retro-reflecting mirrors on the surface of the Moon, measured the lengthening orbital period and (hence) the increasing distance between Earth and the Moon. The fact that the Moon is slowly retreating from the Earth at about 3.8 cm/yr is a consequence of: l. a continuing transfer of mass from the Earth to the moon through quantum evaporation. 2. a natural evolution of planetary satellites towards becoming independent planets themselves. 3. a transfer of angular momentum from the Earth’s rotation to the moon’s orbital revolution as a consequence of tidal friction on the Earth. 4._ “moonquakes”. 5. the Sun's dominant gravitational force which is slowly pulling the Moon away from Earth. 3. Which of the following volcanoes is not a shield volcano? 1. Olympus Mons on Mars. 2. Maat Mons on Venus. 3. Manna Loa on Earth. 4. Mt. Fuji on Earth. 5. Sif Mons on Venus. 4. Which among the following planetary, solar—planet or planet-moon pairs does not show spin-orbit resonant coupling? 1. 10 in orbit about Jupiter. Mercury in orbit about the Sun. The Moon in orbit about Earth. Co-orbiting Pluto and Charon. Neptune and Uranus in orbit about the Sun. Meww 5. The pressure of Mars‘ atmosphere at its surface is 1. about 0.01 (1- one hundredth) that of the Earth's atmospheric pressure. 2. almost exactly the same as the Earth's atmospheric pressure. 3. just about 10 times the Earth's atmospheric pressure. 4. approximately 100 times the Earth's atmospheric pressure. 5. has not yet been determined. 6. In terms of its major atmospheric gas component, the atmosphere of Titan is most similar to that of l . Mercury. 2. Mars. 3. Earth. 4. Moon. 5. Jupiter. EPSC 200 Insert your name and student ID# on the top of this page Page 2 Terrestrial Planets EPSC 200 Winter 2007 Final Examination Section: El 01 Leacock 132 Student Name: El 02 Otto Maass 112 Student Number: Part ll This section comprises 10 short-answer questions. Each question is worth 2 marks and will be graded on a unit scale of 0, 1, or 2 marks. Be brief; restrict your answers to the area of the boxes provided. Total [20 marks] I. Briefl exlain how the densit of craters on a lanet's or moon's surface indicates its surface “a e“. What ossible sources of heat are causin the volcanism on Juiter's moon Io? What gases comprise the atmosphere of Earth and of Venus and in what percentage relative to the total volume or mass of their atmos heres? ossible sources of heat are forcin _ the Earth's mantle into convection? What conditions allow for megathrust earthquakes and where on Earth has, at least, one such earthuake occurred? EPSC 200 Insert your name and student ID# on the top of this page Page 1 1 Terrestrial Planets EPSC 200 Winter 2007 Final Examination Section: El 01 Leaeock 132 Student Name: C] 02 Otto Maass 112 Student Number: 5 How can we use information about the orbit of a moon about a planet to determine the planet's mass? There is no need to exlain this usn athemtic if'you refer not to. The Juan de Fuca plate subducts under the North American Plate off the west coast of Oregon, Washington and Vancouver Island. Where does the Juan de Fuca plate form and how old is it when it reaches th subduction tench? a Under what configuration of the Sun—Earth-Moon system do we observe total solar eclipses on arth? Wh is it that eve one on Earth who can 6 the ecli se doe not see a total eclf se? a The Moon is retreating from the Earth (Its orbital distance is increasing with time.) while the Earth's rotation rate is slowin . Wh “P 1!]. What evidence to we have that the Earth's outer core is liquid and that the Earth's inner core is solid? EPS C 200 Insert your name and student ID# on the top of this page Page 12 Terrestrial Planets EPSC 200 Winter 2007 Final Examination Section: El 01 Leacock 132 Student Name: El 02 Otto Maass 112 Student Number: Part III This section comprises the chart-association question followed by the free opinion question. E Several decades of planetary exploration has revealed much about the bodies, planets and satellites, of our Solar System. On the basis of this accumulated understanding and knowledge, associate properties (of condition, dynamics, composition, internal and surface processes) as listed in column 1 with each of the bodies listed in the several columns to the right. Typically, several bodies among those listed in the columns can be associated with each of the properties listed in each row on the left. Designate each correct association by darkening the circle in the appropriate column below each planet 0r moon's name. Note the example of Earth. [14 marks]. Warning: Incorrect associations will be subtracted from correct ones. Some associations are known to be wrong while some are only possibly wrong. Possibly wrong associations are not counted as “incorrect”. A good strategy is to try to fill in no “incorrect” associations. 0n grading: There are over 200 associations that can be correctly assigned to bodies in the right-side columns. You receive full credit for the Earth examples given. If the number of correct minus incorrect associations exceeds 200, a perfect grade will be assigned. rig . o . . . 5-1 W 5-1;; o a g m : Planet/satellite or moon -) : g E 3:» 2 E E o g- ; E E g _ a 5" <9 z a; H :‘ h 1; u- a: Q .: _. Property assoclated * H 2 on > 5:. > W 5 m P h o: 9-1 2. H g o a D z E U Probes have been landed on the surface ofthisplanetormoon. Eaéojogoio ()2an O OQOsO:O O O 0 Has one or more natural moons or d L ‘ I. I. a u 5 3 i' ' " satellites- aazo'oooogooocyoooooo River-“dike valleyslhave been seen ; a a z : ; E a VI = , (photographed)onitssurface. 3* O; O; O; O; O 0‘ QE 0 03 O; O O O; O have a in iron .. : .. . .. . . ,1: ; core' 920:0 oaoozoc O O O O O O 050 Image? of its iurfaie shop! it 50 b3 : ' » i ' p. t ea ' cra ere an , ' . I . ‘3 . {‘fi‘éieolgyoid.“y 50 o:- o o; o- o. o o. o; o: o, 05 o o. o_ o It is mostly composed of Fe, Mg, 0, Si: : (iron, magnesium, oxygen, silicon) * O O O O O O O O O O O O O O 0 Now hash? certainly once did have u oceans of liquid water I9 0 O O O O O O O O O O O O O O Volcanic eruptions "have been observed » I I while in progress on its surface _ a O O O O O O O O O O O O O O 0 Is known to have basaltic rock on its Surface :eooooooooooooooo Winds have been’observed and their speedsmeasuredinitsatmosphere. * O O: O O O; O; O: O O; Og O: O O O O wateri’ceexistslon its ? ' :giligceormltsregohth (Its mmeral a O O O Oi Oz 0 O O}; O O O: O. O: O 0 Its revolution and rotation periods are I Bglll‘gigilglfally coupled (1.e.sp1n-orb1t v 0 O O o O O O O O O O O: O: O O O Granitic (high silica, SiOZ) rocks have beenfoundonitssurface. * O: O; O O O; O O O; 0: O5 0: Oi O: O “Séiii'mehta‘r‘ rocks,“de osited Wind 25.}??? avebeenwndm‘“ a o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o “Iti'srbimi(woman?)' eriotlll is b d armonica coupe toot er 0 ies . 5 E a...orbiterliiuoupung) o o o o o 0= o 0 00 o: o o. O: o 0 one bf’i’lié four “Galilean moons” gislcalgred by Galileo (and/orMarius) O O: O O O O O O O O O; O; O, O. Q It is the largest of all the moons circling itsmotherplanet. O O O O O O O EPS C 200 Insert your name and student ID# on the top of this page Page 13 Terrestrial Planets EPSC 200 Winter 2007 Final Examination Section: D01 Leacock 132 Student Name: Otto Maass 1 12 Student Number: " ca >. I- "5 «:1E a : m “s Planet/satellite or moon -) 5 g g g g g E o E g- ; g g 5 <3 “'00: D.>~'-'_'i-l+-'-—tc3 ._._ Property assoc1ated W m E g > E a 5 5 a m H 5 2 H Has very few impact craters on its oooo=ooooao surface e o o 010 o. o Reyolvesbabfiut th‘i: Sun or its IIthtlleI‘d : t '. .' ; - : Eefi's‘eerefi‘iivvi’ifi Eé‘rfhlé‘oififtf.°gm e O O O O O O O o o o o o: o o o 0 Its mass is greater than that of Earth‘s 5 g a OWI‘MOOH- evoeooiooaooooooorooo Rotates on its axis more slowly (i.e'. ‘ ; ' " withalongerperiod.)thandoes ‘O O O O: O O: O O O O? O: O O; O: 0.: O Hasaring system ill Ol‘blt aboutit. O O O O O O O O O O O 0 Is known to have (now) an internally ; 3 1 1 I I generated (global) magnetic field. f a I O O O; 05 O: of 01 O O O O? O‘ O 0= 0 RévaiVéé its" orbit about the 'Sun £1?§,rd‘232fe2£553("e'w“h “10”” o o 0: o o o; o o; 0 0i 0% 0% o O: o: o volcanoes,typical-Ofbasalfic . V .. : ....... . V illoggéilave been indentlfied on its 1 a O O: O 0-: O: O O O O or O O? O; O Plate-tectonic processes now occur or I a I. a a I? ' didoccurinthepastonthisbody e O: O 0 Oz; 0; O O: O. O O; 0 Giant cyclonic storms are seen in its atmosphere E9:0 030:0 O‘O§O:O O O;OfO OfOfO It is largely composed of water and 2 i 3 i g g i a V waterices- $0 0 o 0 00:0 o 020 0 DEC oiofo lts diameter (measure of “size”) is g I I I I: greaterthanthatofEarth. O O: O O; O: O; O O O: O O 02 0 01:0: 0 The precession period ofnits rotation aXIS has been used to determine its momentofinertia. O O- QE 0 O O O; O O O' O O} O : Its atmosphere is largely composed of Eggflzglinandheliumwithtracesof O O O O O O O O 0 0:0 0 O Ogo O EIs a satellite (moon) of one of the giant gplanets‘ oooooooooooooooo Is to measurable "leyelsuof 2 = : i 5; : > oxygeninitsatmosphere. * O O O, O; O: O O? O O The main component at its atmosphere 3 3 : V r : iSmOICC‘llarnitmgen- e o of o o o: 02 0% 0; oz oi o; o: o: o; o It has an extremely thin atmosphere f g ; g _ 51$)w1th surface pressures well below 3 O O O I: O: O O O O O O _ O O O 0 It has an atmosphere that is many f i V o 0 0030010 .0 o; o or o o; o o: 0 Its diameter is less than that of Earth's " ‘ M0011 OOOO=O;O§:OOOOfiOOOOO;O Is normally considered to be one of the “terrestrialplanets” e of o o: o 0% o: o o o; o o o of o 0 Liquid filled lakes or oceans have been identifiedonitssurface. Q E O of O Q Of O O o; O O Oi o; OE O Someof its angons'dflzit theplaiiétiii a retrogra e sense i.e.0pposite to V I . the sense of rotation of the planet) 3 O O O O O O O O O' O O O? O O O The main component of its atmosphere ismolecularcarbondioxide. O i O: O; O O: O; O; O5 O: O 0 05 O: of Of O EPSC 200 Insert your name and student ID# on the top of this page Page 14 Terrestrial Planets EPSC 200 Winter 2007 Final Examination Section: I] 01 Leacock 132 Student Name: El 02 Otto Maass 1 I2 Student Number: a An opportunity to express your opinion... Planetary exploration is very expensive. Still, the primal human drive to learn about our environment in the universe maintains us in our quest for such cultural knowledge. In a very short essay or personal opinion statement, restricted in space to the box following, argue either for or against the continuation of this expensive science in view of other pressing problems which face humanity on Earth. I am interested in the opinions of the young who shall soon be taking responsibility for our future. [1 mark] 0:: grading: As this question is essentiallv a personal opinion statement. those students who respond with reasoned consideration to the guestion will be awarded 1 full mark. EPSC 200 Insert your name and student ID# on the top of this page Page 15 ...
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EPSC200-2 - STUDENT NAME: STUDENT NUMBER: COURSE SECTION:...

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