L05a - 1 / 8 Physics 111 Lecture 5a Fig Newton: The force...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 / 8 Physics 111 Lecture 5a Fig Newton: The force required to accelerate a fig 39.37 inches per second. J. Hart Uniform Circular Motion Circular Motion Planets Question Banked curves Vertical Circular Motion Question 2 / 8 When a particle moves in a circle of radius R at a constant speed v , it experiences a centripetal (center-seeking) acceleration a c = v 2 R (1) vectora c points towards the center of the circular trajectory Centripetal acceleration is usually caused by more than one force (a net force) F c = ma c = m v 2 R (2) Without such net force, there is a tendency to move in a straight line (inertia) Uniform Circular Motion Circular Motion Planets Question Banked curves Vertical Circular Motion Question 3 / 8 vector F c also points towards the center of the circular trajectory vector F c is not a new kind of force (not included in GWNTF ) Demo: Ball attached to a string. The tension of the string causes the centripetal force Example: A...
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This note was uploaded on 04/22/2008 for the course PHYS 111 taught by Professor Madrid during the Winter '08 term at Ohio State.

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L05a - 1 / 8 Physics 111 Lecture 5a Fig Newton: The force...

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