Antigone Paper - The Only Crime The term hubris is defined as excessive pride Throughout the play Antigone by Sophocles there are numerous examples of

Antigone Paper - The Only Crime The term hubris is defined...

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The Only Crime The term “hubris” is defined as excessive pride. Throughout the play Antigone by Sophocles, there are numerous examples of characters’ hubris. The conflict in having excessive pride stems from the characters inability to own up to their mistakes. The moment people become too prideful, they are unable to see their own faults. If pride is not conquered, it can result in heartbreaking aftermaths. This is the point Teiresias was trying to make when speaking to Creon. Creon should have listened, but he is not the only character plagued with excessive pride. The kingdom of Thebes is left to two prideful and selfish brothers, Polyneices and Eteocles, Oedipus’s sons because their father dies. The two are supposed to take turns on the throne as King of Thebes, but Eteocles refuses to share the throne. They both become extremely prideful due to their desire for power. Eteocles and Polyneices are blinded by the obsession of gaining power which results into a battle between the two. During the battle, Eteocles is on the same side as Creon while Polyneices is fighting against his own homeland. In the play Antigone by Sophocles, Polyneices’s behavior offends Creon because he believes one should not side with those who would oppose him (Sophocles 2010). Polyneices’s pride led him to oppose his loved ones. The refusal of the two owning up to their actions results in their death. Polyneices and Eteocles’s actions reflect why Teresias point is so important. If the two would have listened to Teresias, none of their actions would have occurred in the first place. At this point of time, Creon is an unprideful man therefore in addition to the circumstances, he becomes King of Thebes. The new King of Thebes not only gains power, but an enormous amount of pride as well. Polyneices’s decision to fight against his homeland angers Creon because of his betrayal towards his own country. This anger and ability from his new power causes Creon to declare a
state funeral for Eteocles while demanding Polyneices’s body to decay in the scorching sun, "I hear proclaim to the city that this man shall no one honor with a grave and none shall mourn.

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