Final - Final Emit) Multiple Choice identify the letter of...

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Unformatted text preview: Final Emit) Multiple Choice identify the letter of the choice that best completes the statement or answers 1he question. i}. ti. to risers soonest ester: sen Fill-F31??? Fancem PP‘FP“ n DP'F-‘p-‘I F'- tlnit'onri distribution of itttman habitats would likely be the resulloi ._ . whereas habitats of other animals would be due to ___ . con1pe1ition; social interaction low; competition social interaction: chemical avoidance limited mobility; contact inhibition The size of a population is controlled by all but which of the following? biotic poteminl [ceding level carrying capacity ot' the environment death rate birth rate The biotic potential varies from otic species to another. is controlled by the timing of the first reproduction. is controlled by the frequencyr of reproduction. is mntrolled by the number of oil's'pring pmdmxlil- all of Lhcttc A situation in which the birth rate plus immigration equals tbc tiealit rate plus emigration is caich an intrinsic limiting factor. exponential growth. saturation. act-o population growth. geometric growth. A population that is growing exponentially in the absence of limiting, factors can be illustrated by which curve? S—shapcd .l—shaped one mat terminates in a plateau phnSc bimodal Binomial i't population will exhibit a negatch growth rate if predation continues indefiniter N is greater than HER. ntlmhcr of births + number of i ntmigrants tonsils number of deaths + number of emigrants. r is less 1l1art Cl. none of these A. change in a population that is NU’l' related strictly to the sire of the population is best described as density—dependent. density-inticpcttt‘lctli. intrinsic. an iii-shaped curve. a J-siiaped curve. in itself. a flood tlmt washes away an entire population of rabbits is a density—dependent factor. an intrinsic limiting :l'actor. a consequence of exponential growth. density-indie pendan all of these 9. The loading oauso of human deaths around the world is o. hem-t disease. to. cancer. e. malnutrition und starvation. d. oar. e. ooeidonis. It}. All but which one ofthe following are the ream [or the rapid population! emphasion of human? I. increase: in carrying calamity h. expansion into new habitats e. removal of limiting [actors d. repmduefim ouenm‘ng earlier in the life cycle e. linger generation Em ll. Theuememhmherofleinlheomherofhumbdogiowrdnmofmepw ltllywsisaruihrlahlem a. immandvmnflioopmgnou h. outminlituol‘ previously underutilized mm o. Mqulfimhfimdpuehymfi. d. Attofrheabov: I1. Which of the following isNtTl' a fmlurlhfllhlu led to the dramatic Unease in Il'tehunmmuiwiun? it. increase of eozrying capacity b. town] of Moral Iirrrifing [actors e. human im‘asirm of new habitats and climatic zones d. an increase in the levels of pollution in the world e. the development of public health and flu: gem theory of diseioe 13. The groom reduction of human population in mooted history was thr: result of a. a global ice age. 11. two world writ. o. bubonic plague. d. fumin planning. e. omit»: dopletiori. I4. The moat mmnable modtod of limiting human population growth is 3. increasing carrying capacity. 1:. docreasing birth nae. 4:. drumming omnpofidon. _d. iomasiog {loath me. e. exploiting outef spam. IS. lfdie reprodueait-emmtspo toihexuinlenanoe lit-gel (zero prrfulmjtmgmfi],how many year-is] wth it takefor would populoriootostopgmaiag? 1t) it} so room-r lit] lfi. When the bum popnhfiongromhofihe world ir- is a. aboutlhesmuitmmymago. in. decreasing lion aoeeiuaaoi place. i: imiog shiwly. ii. in ii gradual decline. o. about LEE. 1?. 'l'he ago-Melon: diagram for rapidly growing popululitms o. isinthe formofapyrmtid. b. he ohoraelorimod by a large percentage of the population in the posireproductive years. c. has a very broad base showing a large number of young. d. has about equal distribution among all age groups. o. is in tho form of u pyramid and has a very broad hose showing it large number of young. Iftcpmdmiuu mu early in the 1H: qlclc. “mat owns? Popuhfiuu gun-I]: rue inauses. Populaiun six: duclims. H3qu sin '1: an! arm ficmralim time hams. Gm'th mic-mu my. 999?! . In whidldamrgmphlc made! ispnpulaliflu gm tlmfastcsl” mmww kamitimlal ind-Jamal Pastinphfitrial . Four af the five ant-twch Hated below an: Hump-natan 01' the abimi: unvininmanL Select the umcptton, mit ' rainfall mnpctitms Winn: Sunlight .MMflmdmwwfin m- rdmhndy mum our film. pflflyflmmmufln gnu-dually mm: our in vary mptdly. damning 11pm curirnumul cmditilm an: flufiuat'rng wildly. FFPFPE nnnvrg Eryn; M M . A pnpuiattun is the unit nf avuttltiun. Consisde inmbmdin: mambcrn Inf the same sputum. shares tile 5am: gm pool. grams at an “mm-min] rm: when the birth ml: annuals the dull: m: at a mum! diffcmnlialt no mam haw slight flu diffmm. all of than: 551 13'? P .Whfimfikawflmammcmmafafiimmm? datum-glint pupniuiondcuitj pupnluhmsiu wwwmmw alluch . A J-slmpnfl growth curve i5 cunvertad to an S-sl‘mpefi fine when the parents are past mpmductive use. if U11: data am planed tn rcvcrsrz. when the carrying capacity is matched. If mpmductinn stflps. ant}- ro: fast—yow'ing pupulalims such as harm-in. FPPF?§ Pnnrflg .Thcmyingupacityud'mmfimnmmthdmmudhy Mnumdnmdmfmflcmm mflshayflicuwc. Ihcpruhuiunmkunthcfunales. dismmfluflhjhuhmm thesustfinuhhwpplyufmhwkb. FFFFFm as. in natural communities. some feedback mechanisms operate whenever populations change in size; they are a. density -dependent factors. it. density-independent factors. c. always intrinsic to the individuals of the community. cl. always extrinsic lo the individuals of the coninuuiity. e. none of these 21'. Life tahles provide data concerning a. expected iif e span. h. reproductive age. c. death rate. d. birth rate. L7. ail of these 23. Which of the following statements about tlte human population is false".-r a. The human population on Earth today is more than a trillion people. 53. Water ttse has remained about the same over the East 5U years. c. Countries vary greatly in Lheir available ecological capacity. t‘i. iltli'titttia continue to suffer from overpopulation and overconsamption. e. Humans living in the United Shims today Lise more than four times aieir share ot'availaiile ecological capacity. 29. 1|r‘v'hicli ol' the following statements is false?I a. As women‘s status and education increase. they choose to have more children. h. After E950. mortality rates declined rapidly in most developing countries. e. A. human population in which women reproduce at an earlier age will experience faster population growth. L‘l. Humans conLinue to suffer from overpopulation and overconsamption. Humans living,Ir in the United States today use more than four Limes their share of available ecological capacity. 30. Which of the following positions is most iilceiy to be helpful in responding to environmental problems? a. Humans are Ll'tt: root of all evil and can never make up for the harm they have done the planet. it. Most of me human population is composed of vie:ims ofa few powerful industries who are causing severe environmentai degradation. e. Life is as prod as it has ever been in the course of human history. and there really isn‘t much of a problem. d. Individual 'snotvierige, attitudes, and action can maize adifference. 31. 1v‘r'liich of the loliovving is NOT usual as a resell-of printediou'.J a. The level of the predator population is nniintained near or Lit-ion- the carrying capacity. is. isotlt predator and prey undergo selection leading to coevolution. c. The predator or prey becomes extinct. cl. The level of the prey population is maintained near or below Lhc carrying capacity of the env ironrnent. e. The predators need prey. 32. no interaction between two species in which liotii species benefit is known as a nuttualism. h parasitism. c. commeusaiistn. cl compcijtion. I. predation. -—r-nu_ _ ,sac’a 1:19de with Paramecium gran-ht; in test lull-ti. he Wind that -_pnisma with similar hide: 1iii-ill earth-e emgh in sun-ire in different aid-hrs. wganisma with slightly different feeding hnhies will change in become exclusive crimp-Ethan mganisms with similar {ceding lnhib: may mpente In lhc point uf extinction. nrgnnisms with slightlyr different feeding habits will change in became exclusive cctttpcllwrs. and organisms with similar feeding habits ma}.I cnmpetc in the paint an" eatittctintt. e. organism with similar nicks will ewh-e chm-ugh to Survive itl fifferem niches. and urganisms wilh similar feeding habits may compete to the paint nl' mfinc‘tirm. P-ra .Inmmmt In a predamr. apamtite Emil}- than mat lrill theanhnal m: which or in which it lives. kills its hml. is a Shari-term vislinr. is larger than its host. does not till the animal cm which or in which it lives and is larger than its husL FF—PP‘F: lull 5. Pbplllzlimi an: held in check by resumes: put-thinning, weanlian Sccial PWll'lSIIL competiticn. all rrf these FP-F-FI'P' 36. Chemical! in llth planls and animals. serve as which cit—the inlhmtng an Wham” a. warning; h. repellents c. tinting i]. had males a all of film 3?. Which at the follow.ng simmer“: about pamsilei is true? a. Paras-in:- anally do not kill their heats. b. The paniaiie species that infects :1 pen-Lieular host species; hccnmea lit-ES virulent mrcr ei'clu'linnary time. c. Wann-hiflhderl animals are frequenlly infected by [thrash-:5. 11 Bath :1 and b e. a Ihrmtgh t‘. 33. Which Of the liJllfl'l-‘ll'lg docs NUT apply II} Willows? lL insects in. kill animfllfl on which they fetid C. item equally survives- d. smaller in size than prey r. efiecti're hiaennhnl agenfi 39. During the prams»; nfmmmnnity amine, :1. the rural hinmaas remains enan in. Ihereat'e increasing ['Il'llifill’llllll'flli fnr resflurce paiflhuning. a: the pioneer martin: gives way quickly in line climax climate-nit}, followed by a sum-easiort uf mime diverse array: of m’ganinns. d. nutrients cycle we rapidh’ with time. a. all of these 40. Which of Ihefullnwing represent an early- arlage in primary annexation? a pine trees h. moss and lichena on itare rock 1:. weedy annual plants in an nan-en field :1. climax Species in stamina 41. I. b. l"F'"I"" 41'. PHFF# 4.. 3- n9??? SIP-991'}; 45. nnnvr pprvng 4‘:- T. rip-in nppgpg The plants anti animus now present an acmgc from which the nuns were ramut'fld tcrt years cafl'mr rcpt-cant a climax [must mommy mm species lawn-dustbin. Which (if the. fnliuwing is Email likely in bc a cause (if extinclinu-E" astumid 1m pact human activity adaptive mfialkm manic dint“: chm; ‘iifhich uf the [allot-hing is amt like}: III: mm: ul‘ I11: cumulcxfinctiuu asteroid impact human activity adaptive radiation tectonic activity dim-31¢ dung: Wmmfinifimtimpufldhmmimmisthe immui sinusitiqu [at m diuugard for human right; upunflttiai mud [or fifth mam-:3. lack it! living spam. increase In Cfimfl. A relatively namw corriqim Ding-finial: almtg I stream or river is called a . Four {if the: m1: answers fisttd below an: events that land to mommy summitm. Seine: the flcuptiun. awning dump! in atmpicii minions! ahndouingawnm fink] mdagiacicriahlash tflcfinishaiafirc Murmmflmmdm ismmud Wham Shakespem wrote about the wufld us a. stage and such of 13 being piaynrs'. It: was unknowingly refuting m the biaiugiml concept at“ Successian. Ihc niclw. The intuttcfiuu helium mu Specie-5 in which built species May be harmcd is imam-n m1 mutuniism. parasitism. commwfllififl'l— Wit-Etime pm Fulfil—£1131“ t?“ .- '.'-1'-. .I mutuaiisrc. ecatmeamiisni. e. competition. Ci. predation. e. parasitism. 5D. 1i'v'hich is NU 1‘ an example of cecvointion'? a. insect and flower h. predator and prey c. host and parasite rl. model and mimic e. sharks and dolphins 51. All of the following are desirable attributes of an elTeetivc parasitoid control agent except; a. They are well adapted to Use hast. it. They have limited search capability. c. The reproductive rate is high. d. They are mobile. c They are capable of quick in their responses to host population change. 52. The climax community a. is formed by species with the greatest range of environmental tolerance. Ll. is the most common community found it: an area. c. changes over time. d. is vvell adapted to the climate and persists until the climate changes. 53. A. keystone species is a. a single dominant species. h. in centre] of the prey species. c. exemplified by Lin: sea star. d. a single dominant species and is cacmplified by the sea star. e. a single dominant species: is exemplified by the sea star; and is in control of the prey species. 54. Stable eeexistence between predator and prey is least likely to occur on an island that is a small and distant item the mainland. b. small and close to the mainland. c. large and close to the mainland. rl large and distant from the mainland. c none of these. 55. Exotic species that are introduced into a non-native habitat usually a. interbreed with nativ e species. b. drive endemic species to extinction. c. die out due to competition from native species. d. blend in vvith endemic species. e. create habitat islands for themselves. 56. A habitat a- has distinguishing physical and chemical features 1:. is where individuals of aspecies normally live c. is occupied by various species d. a and h e. a through c 57'. A niche a. is the sum of activities and relationships in a community by which individuals of a species secure and use resources. h. shifts in large and small ways. c. is anvarying tor a given species. d. I'm-tit a and h e. a Litmugl'l L' l———F. 53. Two species ll'l'IZI'IlB habitat can cocaist when Buy a. differ in their use of mums. b. share the sum: resource in diffctmt ways. c- use the saute mace at olfl‘mut time. d. all DI the above 59. A. pcednlctpqiahfionand pm}- popcluioo l. alwcysminltrchfircly cubic inch. h. mquicwimguluchcngcsmdmfim c. mmfihkfinilcl} it] llhcsamchafilat. d. botltlinedc 60. The biodivcmity ol 2 region iii an outcome of a. climate and topogtaphf. b. possibilities for digmsal. c. ctrt:tl‘ttlir.tuar}r history. cl. all of the etich fil. Which of the following combinations of organisms could it: expected to smive itt Isolation from other forms of life available? a. produocm and decompose-rs b. producer: and only omit c. carnivores and decomposch tl. herbivores. mivorcs. and ocean-mum c. producers only. £2. Wastes wound accumulalc and Mt nutrients would stop cycling if the in the ecosystem died. a. plum: and luminous b. haul: and fungi c. Burn-mun. romance-m5. and memos :1. bunch 9. plans (t3. Het‘bivorc: represent the :L prim commoners. h. secondary comm c. lcrliuty consumers. d. prinwy producers. c. secondary producers. 5-1. A community eiffem from an ecosystem in that L111: former does NOT incluclu a. unicellular organisms. h. dccompoem. c. ebiotic {nonliving} factors. 11. unicellular organisms and documptmcrs. c. unicellular organism. decomposcm. and ubiotie factors. 65. lulmtol'lheeecrgy available to: ptimmyeommcr I. 1int-ill be and epic 1tat-low. biological activities. I: will hem-cried into m. t: bmhnldirccdyfmcoiumm: ti. fillbcpusedonmthcanhmlflnll‘eedcuponit c. hpuscdoutodeemnposcn. 156. Which ol'fltc followingsulemcnts B truac’.J :I. A populufion cannot cxcccd: the carrying capacity can tcmpotariljr. b. Anorpfimcanoccupymccthononeuophieieucl, deputclinp tip-cullicfecding habitsol'lhc “Salli-5'"— c. {Juice population of organitutul hccomc isultucd. they remain to by various types of isolation mechanism- cl. The limits ol'u population are all traced to climatic or physical factors. c. Organisms with different ct'tilt.tIl-'.'Itt:,tr1.r backgrounds can occupy thc some niche at the some time. Ti}. Frit-= r-e-rr i-J 9-95ng FD-F‘U'P i-Hl moo-5.1 3. od chtdns nuer have more then more lei-cl; {if consumers hmufic the animals are too large to search for prey. the growing season of pitian is not [ting enough. pyramids do no: go that hi gh. the amount of energy siiil eveilebie is too SiIIflii. the}; tire easily. Stehility of an ecosystem can usuaiiy he increased by increasing the length of :1 food chfliu. number (ii—individuals in the ecosystem. number of species in die ecosysmm. biomass contained in the rim trophic level. hahiiru boundaries. Deconiposem perform Ulfiii' recycling efforts on rirgmiisriis at the end of :1 food chain. on The top of a pyramid. 1hat are producers. that are consumers. iii! of these Which sutmtence is magnified during transfers in woes-stems? fat-soluble pesticides eiutluhydrtdes inorganic phosphates lei-soluble pesticides and cartsihydmtes fol-soluble pesdc'rdes. carbohydrates. and inorganic piioepiiarcs Long-iasLing pesticides such :13 DD'I' are target—specific. ere H'tc mosLei'i'wijve control over pests. build up in concentration :13 [hey piles Ijirougi'l a food Ei'lfiil'l- break down after Lhe organism that receives the pcsdcidc dice. are increasing in usage. . 'l'iie ultimate source of El." energy in a Ierreetrial ecosystem is Ult: organic matter in aii the organisms of the ecosystem. WHLEF. sunfighL carbon dioxide. Mostof the energy wili'tin an ecosysterrt is lost when organisms disperi-Le. when organisms die. as e resuit of memboiism. by organisms 3|. Lhe [op of me food web. . At the hotLom or base of e pyramid of energy are the primary producers. secondaril-r producers. primer)» consumers. secondary consumers. Lertiury consumers. Energy pyrarriids are characteristic of ecosystems because not all of what is eaten is absorbed hp :3 consumer. not oil of what is kiiied is eaten by a predator. note“ of who! is produced in one Empi'iic lei-'ei is Consumed L1}.-I organisms ilI the next highBSI trophic level. both it and h a: Lhrough c TISL Energy flew in an emsysuem is a. cyclical. it. misty. reversible under tfifferem umdititms. a mammalian mechanism. new . [if the energy that enters rune trophie level. approximately what percent becomes uvaiiuhit: for the next tmphic level? It'll] Ill I [3.] EH“ FF-FF'Pj _ Male-rials i:|1 sedintmtery cycles pass through both it maid and :1 gm phase. are never present its gases in the ecosystem. are present as liquids in Il'te earth but as gases in the atmmsphere. pass thmugh both a solid and a gaseous phase. and are presem as liquids in the Etu'lll. but as guess in the We“. mmiuumlids tweed E‘ Which of the following her: NUT [:ftflfl thmugh an mug-sum? a. water it. certh e. energy ti. phuspimms e. nitmgen Bi}. Which cf the felhwing Statements is false? 1 mmmmdetsmmpresemmhhmhips between hiugauehunied (Initiatinth mm b. The physiml envireru-uem has virtually no reservoir {er trust elements. e. IIIPIIU from the physical entimnment and tunneling made pufiihle by ticmmpflets and detritit'ores nmintain the nutrient reserves in an ecosystem- cl. In most majer ecosystem. the tenement mltrients that is cycled within the. ecosystem is miter than thee.th enteringu-r leaving lite emsysmm in a given year. e. Once element: are in the biuhtgical parts til‘ the hingeuchemital qreles. they an: unlikely ttt leave until the organism dies. 31. The Hubbard Emit wntushed studies revealedtheimptmeenftree metsin meeting Itemicaleimlmutm emsyflem. Client-Ilium of calcium [055 is perfumed hy amp-ling a. the roots ef the trees. h. the mi! of the watershed. t:. the stream exiting the watershed. d. the roots at the trees and the sail hi the watershed. e. the tenets of the trees, the soil at' the “mashed. and the stream exiting the watershed. 81". (hm-n is stored in what fm'.’ a, biomass in. fossil fuels c. llmenune racks d. shell: elf animals :3. .all of these 83. Which plants are planted to increase the what {If nitrogen In the sell? a. mutton end euntfloupe vines h. legume: r: mints d. grates e- heaths animals obtain minerals such as phosphorus P primarily dissolved in drinking water. it. by inhaiation. c. in meats. ti. by eating plants. c. it] Ittcats and by eating plants. 35. A dramatic enrichmentof nutrients in an ecosystem is referred to as a. aillotrophieation. decomposition. energy transfer. eutrophieation. detrittts. r1114:- y: 315. Most living organisms are dependent upon plants because a. giants produce oxygen as :1 lay—product of photosynthesis. i). as producers, Litcy form the base of food chains. c. they function to prevent erosion and reduce desertification. Ll. as may remove earbon dioxide from the atmosphere. they reduce lite problems generated by the greenhouse effect. c. ali of these E'i'. Which of the following is NOT true of ecosystems? a. Although they may include many different species. many features of ecosystem strucrure and function are alike. Autotmphs secure energy and nutrients that are then used by hererotrouhs. Energy cycles and minerals fiotv through ecosystems. Many different niches are represented in most ecosystems. Ecosystems are characterized by relatively few trophic levels. scarier SE. Liecomposers u. are able to enter a food chain atany trophie Icvei. b. are the most numerous organisms in an ecosystem. c. include bacteria and fungi. d. all of these e. none of these 39. The difference between gross primary productivity and net primary productivity is a. the amount of sunlight refieeted by plants. I}. lhe rate of photosynthesis of ault‘iLrophs. c. the rate of restpirtrtiort of autotropils. d. the rate of herbivorous consumption of aoLotroplts. c. so small it cannot be calculated. 90. Assume. that an energy pyramid has four Eevels {producers pins Ihrce consumers}. and also assume that the energ ' iI'I Lilli Without—tr ievet is set at 100%. What percent of the energy in the producers will he obtained by the tertiary consumers? a. ran h. iii c. 1 J v d. [H I' e. {inol 9t. All but which of the foliovring are affected by climate? a. land surface b. takes c. oceans d. atmosphere e. deep oceans . Tin: ammmt of ultravinlct radiation. hitting the earth's surfnu: is greatly rcdueed by which an: in flu: atmphm? {mt-n: nxygcn tum upur cult-nu diuxidc Hiflngm fiflfifl' 15 ....FN D m .Alltmwhichuiflacfdluwingfxmappflrmbcmrrducd Ii‘ithldcctcastiuamia-sphuficam? Wfificimwflm WMJMM mutant! hlciianncnfshinm WMHamflmicwmdimflc . An My: in the ammumufutrraviuh radian-an is FFFPE nnnr G- E E. 95. Mujur air masses rise frnrn L11: uurth'g surfmc at I. the uquatur and 3f! dngrcc latitudes. h. 3'] dcgmnudfifldngmrlulitudna I; Ihl‘: aquatnr and fit] degree latitudes. d. 30 tie-511:: infirm-as and the pairs. :. 45 new [mimics and flu: prim 96. TWm-pudunudmgmairmm a. pay. I}. black. l'.‘ W11. d mi. 1: blur. 9'1. A natural imminu rufm u: a. an abnormal 0mm uni prediclcu by mummgnts. h. an indiun am. c. an unusually quick change in wmthn-r patterns. {1. tin: prim: of cool air drainage at night. u. n layer nmeI uir truppfii undurnnnth n tumult blank-:1. Elli. Whuu fnssil incl burning givus luff pmficmms and sulfur nxidcfi. we have a. phnlmhmnical 5mg. h. imiuslriui 5mg. c. a i‘hfl'fl'fli inrminn. d. but]! a and c in an of [Inst 99. Acid rain __ I. hermit: the rruzhhiiity of tunic heavy mus. l1. hflcmjarmfarthcpnflucfimufmrfithknmmcwufl c. is mint-alt: with a 1:” about 'r'. d. i: primiiy the Mill ul' induutriui pailutiun. c Aflhfichsflu'isninmwithnpflahmc’f‘mmL |DIJLTh¢ primry mas-an fur clinmic stiff-2mm from one part at the world in mull: is a. differemes in nun-asylum: mum. b. dil'fcmttial absorption of rain: energy. E. pin-ailing wind currents. d. diffcms in humidity. n. the amount and typr; (if pailutirm prurient. 4"".— F I ah: Shaina-'5 [III Ih: ninth-IF skins. .. an the nun-nindgr sides. t; details an the nun-tritfly sides. t1. Wrath: glasshndt. on the windswept sides. E. all of that: 10211:: fennatiun at" momtslutt affects the climate and vegetatiett (if the surmttntling area: it; the greutest extent by influencing a. meant-ire. h maistnm relationship e. fight teem d wind. 1: Pressure mill-“lost desert him-nus are in clue: proximity to: what tithe-t hinme? a. tundra b. grasslands c. decidumts {amus- tl. eve-rm farm e. mitt fulfils IMIlte Hume-mt in danguufdesertificafion i: It. flatten. b. stemmed. e. deal dunus foreat. d. lmpieul rein formt. e. misn- lfliJ'ltc binme Ill—151M Wade-lat: Ila-{mt bier. Mlle-ts] is the a. deutL h. unpieel rain forest. t1 chapttml [shrubi-tnct-tl ti temperate deciduous forest. e. edge. 1015-111: [tutu flaw: of the 1930: was the result of destrucfl'nn at“ a. defied 11. ML c. align» [Haiti]: ti. W Emilie. e. temperate titratide films!— EG’J’.A Home with grant as primary producers and scattered trees adapted Lu prolonged dry spells is knew at it a. warm desert. b. savanna. Ir. Itde ti. nip 1:. Chianti-1L Iflltfl'lte Name with the Mditerfity uflit't: i: a. tundra. b. migtt. e. tmplcul rain forest. :1. desert. egrusland. Wile tropical rain fit-tests. a. Wlifiim fflt minim: Sunlight is ham. I}. diversity is limited became the tall {mutt mm- shuts out most of the lemming light. it. eunditiens are eattrlent-elgl.r favorable fut growing luxuriant food erupt. :1. there is little competition for resources. u. hablmt partitiuniug is minimal. I Ifl.F'°nmuIrnsl m law minIull an: manna-lime ul‘which hiumc? a. banal [mm a. mom: mfim I'mt 1:. unit: d. mum mum {m 1:. tinddumu forests 11 LArcfiu and alpine mndras an: alilu: in all but which of the following ways? a. low muismre b. pm'uufrtm :. minimal plantlifa :L cult] Wm l. aim-poor soils Illlnnhke. lb: upmsnnflt mm ism phymphnkmn is refuted mm: which mac? a mic b. Emmi: c. Hum-ll d. pmfundai u. Hamill: I I lflligmmphlc late: are Mtg-rim by all but which of I11: Rimming? {Imp W p b. c. shun-dull mum i hw nm E. high Mm III fish I I4_Whid: of [I‘ll fumme Is mimalclm’.’ n. alignmphlc lake—high productivity b. coal wulcr‘high' gas ounltul c. eunuphic lain—pulle ‘1 culimphil: Iflmlun c. runnphi: lat:me dupldiou “515: main: mfiuhumand alumni: is III: I. nn'itic mm b. canary. c. Sufi: mac. :1. fifluml region. 1:. peiflgic mm; lififlpwclling a. immune: pruduuirity by brinng nuuicnI—rich uni “FEET In flu: surface of I11: mm. 1:. 00cm in freshme take: when the Ihcrmodin: is dcflmyud h}: changing mm c. Mbkmllafimdpofluflminmm d. memmnmfiWfiedydtmfim t. gemhulhtmajuclimficdnnguinumfidficflumtmwnnflflifin. I 115913! radiation thin-.5 lhu distrihmiun Inf weather systums and so infinmccs a. mnpmlur: aortas. b. rainlhll dismhufinn. c. seasonal variafinm :1 all of I11: We. llflficgiuuhu—hfimuinfltginhmmuhfinfaflmdmpumdcpmdm a. gbhllirciicnhlion. h. mam C- W3- 6. alluflhcnhuvc. .111: major anus; cf acid rain I: npmfian inf .1. madam- pawcr giants. h. aummnhflcs. c. Naming plants. :1. agrimluml mum lz'flflming_. dCEPEI'. nflm nuLdmt-rkh mm mm: In the sm‘fm cf 3 body pl m. a. min; umunn. c. uni-filing [3. fall mm :1. III of I11: than: c. upwelling. ...
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Final - Final Emit) Multiple Choice identify the letter of...

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