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Exam 2 - magi-flesh Anthropology 1m Spring 2693 Human...

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Unformatted text preview: .___.. magi-flesh Anthropology 1m Spring. 2693 Human Eiaauflami Origins .1“! Hail TAKE-HOME WORK ERA“ LlTB-Z- Fal SEMESTER. 2003 {Mn Set WM?) Whamm.me..mmm,mne,ammmmflasmmm¢m tollewingflflqmslions- Pleaseuseanmmsheetonwhflimmymxms. memsmmmosmsmmmneeeesemmoevoua senesreaeeaoeroavmsemss.Wa “him” 1. Whieethmgraphyism-depflismdyofaslnglamfime emmlogyismeeomparativesadyd ure. @True 3; False 2. Mutation is a net-mast]: force in the evolutionary prooess. t3} True ELFalse 3. The oieviete. or oeilarbone increases maneuverability in primates hy permitting the arms to swing sideways and outward from the trunk of tire body A True s False 4. gamutans WI'ID have been taught symbolic language were able to use it in creative ways. True Fa ise 5. Chosflanhelietiamermananmmpdogiselahdiescanprmidemeulfimete "I‘ruth' ooneemithhe orlghsottwnanlamiammemiveiseierflleindividuat (:ng B. Wmmmmmmmm TI'IJE .Fflse T. FWWmmimhMmdeWh pmposeeefdehale.era&ury.andrhetefie. A.Tme @9me 3. Evolution is the prams through wl'lidi earth‘s ltfeforrns have gradually become me eomplexand ' rentlated. True . False 9. Theposflionolmefommenmagnunisretatedtofltedegreeoterednessofmehabituatstanoeot‘ organism. True . Fatse 1D. EthnogmptficfieidmtrisneverdoneinWestemsoeieties. A.True @ False 11. Guilereispresenedand transit-titted byla‘lguflge me .Faiee 12. Selenoe attempts to unravel the absolute truth in all phenomena. A True @Fese 11 In the aeseooe of oontinuous enulronnmntal and so ecological mange. bustogieal {revolutionaryI ehangewooktmetranosenseandmrtdnotm (34 True 14. Cross-sulhrral emnogrephlo and oress—speeies ethologioat studies both tend to suggestttvrat specific humanreeponseetofiflfitling bastebiotogimtemotionaLandpeydiotogieal needsareteemrd Hannah rnimiuy caning rriahlation flatter than inhen'ted. True . False , 15. Grossneuttural ethnographic and uess-spedes ethologiml studies both tend to suggest that a eonsiderebte amount of basic human behavior. psychologioai sharaoter. and emotional need is gommmmmmmmmminMdemaflon. True B. False 1.5. its shudural parfieulars the hominid foot Is triumphsilo-glimlhlr unique in all the animal kingdom .mphoiogioaly sinflar to the feet of outer honiooids C. morphologically indistinguishable from the pongid toot D. mphoiogibalty similar to the feet of all andrropoids E. nuptwiogieafly very similar to the tnrtirtld hand 1?. Cuitwat anthropology is the systematic stimulit of the standards by which societies operate. “these was A. are biologically inherited. B. operate only when people are unooneeious. C. den be studied only by sociologists. are Isarned and oorlstitute 'UJM." . are inherited. and are studied by physio-l anthropobgists. 18. Members of the thomtnoid— inehsda A. human beings apes and monkeys human beings and apes . human beings, apes. and monkeys E apes 19. Wmdmmdmmmmmmmme Cresaceeue Bless'IyEccene -0Iigooene Diammmttmgheaflyflname Ethene 2i}. Because of the field at tendsto study recent societies-of Norm America and Europe. his more susceptin to stature-bound assumptions than is the field of which studies a wider range of humgnflscfleflssfi—u [ Woo'firmlrurai anfl'rropoiogsLB mwmhjrsical anthropology mitts-at mmropologylsoctdlogy . Warmest Mommy E phyla-m mmrupologylcutural mineralogy 21. Mmamdmmmmmmmmmmrm ‘3 the ' unease. B; bottom. (I. lieu-nu. t}. orangutan. E. tarslsr. 22. The primate skeleton reflects the h'nportsnce in pdrnate evolution of most of the following character-lattes. Which of the following does it NOT reflect?- A. a large brain B. upright pcshre messed significance of smel .tlexflsle lines and her-Ids Emotusesbouewatnitrefledsalldtmsabove} 23. mommmmmmmswymbemmmmwd meageofflmearfltmaeoriginsrfltemndmeappeamofmmankm: radiocarbon darting penseiun'I-argon dating _ dendrochrcnelcgy D. obsidian hydration dating E. a and c 24. Barnfiire charcoal. human bones. seashell earrings. and animal bone sewing. needles all can be dated directly by means of A the K—Ar n'hsll'icd. E. the listen-track method. (I. meaninoadd racemization undead. mean I'm E cand d 2?. 31'}. 31- TheflveshoidshmedfinelohgideofiogioamsmoltheEarm haveheenidentiliedonthehasis of geologically rapid mass extinrdions of plant and animal life. Suoh even-episodes typically have boon followeo'swiflly by A. the appearance of numerous radically different life~forrns B. reductions in the number and variety of lilefomts C. a very gradual rehtdldhg ol the natural erwironrnertt @ maid mfipfiafim and dhersifioafion of the imam W E. slableIumndlfiemmlfirmofmesufifingfle-fom's The ideal basic primate diet is a high fiber one in nature predominantly FL ineeolivorous B. oarnlvoroua G. minerals @r I. . animals Braohiatlon and its morphological expressions made their appearance during the: A. middle Paleocene El. late Emaeeady filigooene G. early Oligooene D. late Glam-e313 hfiooerie E. late hiooerae Fruitbeadng trees and flowering plants began to assume irrqsorlanoe unearth about Til-El million yrs ago on million yrs ago (3. 50 million yrs ago D. 35 miller: yrs ago E. 2:] million yrs ago The oapadlyfwflgiflaeot hiaedallm'n in an extinct hornlnoirl form night he deteded in the morphology of the patella the distal {lower} farm-end . the stemmr D. the arm [W] title-end E. the Wits maple-x imam-angled femurs and disproportionately-sized liemural oondyles are mareoteristis of A. true hominids_,o_nlx ‘ 3- all living was C. living fl Elliot anihropoida D. human beings and apes. ELEM Yale'soheduled instructor forthris flees preemtly isoonduoling anll'irqxeogioal 'husinees‘m hettalf ofSanDiegoState Unhrersity andfl'ieUnltedSlamofAmerioainthenationof A. Borneo B. Belguirn c. Bolivia Belize . Brazi 32. mmhmmmmmdwmmmammemmmmmfic 33. WthWW-WMBWWMhflMw in? A. mepehfihhumnevdmmstmmbblegiealespeflyterhnguageemeged B. the historical construction of image isntilies. to see mum different lei'rgmges diuerged item a mum steak .the investigation of the characteristics of the sketetet remains at murder teatime 34. A Wis: meesienei bipedal Insert-rotten Is present emeng: 35. mmmmmmmmmmmmw wmmmwmmmmd hmmm B. divi'rgpm C.elivingan1tuupoids D.el|ivingtu:nrnirreids Eeltiving pnmbsmsmefliermemmis (sudtasmfltts) 35. Whefien is eenhnlted by the tube efthe memn'retien eerehreieeriex: A. ”ml _,.' Elm] _ peristet - e. eesipitai . "w“ 5. camera! 3?. Thelmesugefiveeppmeehtermedflte'seisntflismefl'red' ishaseden @devetepingandtestfltgetbmehvepefiflifia B. reiediuflteheidemtelprenisesetaeeepledrefigm Centmiexmaflmfleeirmdefinga'fitesfing DJeiefhfleefimnedmdmmflumseaflfleWWmmfl ehsavatien 33. Ecehgyie Afllesystenuficshflyeflifingsedefies flfllesystemficshflyufhumphysmhgy .eesysmemefammmm systerrIaflcshjdyef relationships hebueen ergmismsencttheirsunmeQs .thesystemetis strayefprehisterie human behavior 39. VMWh-m.maflmmmreledbyflm labeal'the mammalian cerebral cartex. A frontal 49. The evalutlanary develapmanls gylrninating in the appearance cf the Wham as we tuna at them must have acumen amass-newly bellman A 2!} and 15 nu'flian years age élsand 1a million yearsega mandfiyearsmilllanyeatsaga .5alfl3nflhnyearsaga E. 3 and 1-5-miilian years age 41. 51mm ' calstsmiprawje‘ WWW Aanaerdflle-fann‘srelalhaleueiafcerearaldevelcpntem an ancient liia-Emmsraialiveacuiarl’alfaclmy dependence calamitientfla-fiam'sn'lalarflaaamathrempaafldlee D al" figfiflhurinaid'sabilitylacammmicale 3' E allafthe shave I 42. Pastnrartem cssificafianafmacarfiiagimasrearal'mshian' A. enables anttucpalagisls ta detennlne the age and sex cl hmnan skeletal remains apicalmseriaussmalsa‘eeslnalderimwldmls C. flesdficiarnbipedallacamaflmdd‘fiam IWnflefifimn maids.“ E. band: -' —-' —” ‘ 43. Basides being interested in desa'iptians af paltiwlar cultures the elhnalagist Is Interested In a particular ta improve mam @WW Mans 'c'f—ncffifin-Ian sacieties D- pramalzingWeslaemways- EleadingiaadfarageISIIaHrBJmflrm-savmggadgets 44. e ultimate casts'af evalullanary saccaas far IIIrIIIIr species ar papalatian is ils raptudualjve ararnrass. _ the fitness cf its amidual Heaters. ' .jefihllsaaflflic htuapnnt. E. I: WI aim} Mquflsspedafizafianmflsadaptafimmflsmdesadal ernrlranmenus}. 45. Midtclfirelaflcwhgisaalmeafmefmrbrarfltesalammpalagy? Aarchaealagy HBJInguistica . ethnology E physical anthcrrcrtjalcqgeyr 45. A theory may].r be defined as @‘a true emlenatien sf hnw things work that Is beyond malienge asystemetexptmtlnnanivedatbyteefing ntenereushypothesesmaseden mesemathaire beenvaiiflated. Quirathmmhemmrflmplmafle. D.abeiieffl'tathasnebmisinfaet. E. a hypothesis. 4?. Aspartetywrjeb. yummy studytheftequeney efhleedtypesinhuman pnputafinns.nrwatd1fl betminrufmfieya'idepee ordigforeatyhminidheneshEastAtnm Ynuareatan ethnntngist. rimetetog'tst. Cethno target IW We 43. www.mmenemueeemnemmmm? A. intensive fieldwork deneinesingie society thnngraphiee from all ever the merit! as that statements matte sheet culture will be unwersallj piteahte Cqu'idwide queetimmaire smileys amusemmmwmmmbmdmmnmmm Emefltenfleeabmewfiwetnmnflatedbymepeoptewuhaseshflied #9. Which of the following ls mast likelyI to analyze human remains te reeenstmet the preseasee at human eeetu '2' mm W— archaeologist . predater 512i Anmmpolegyiefiflelentfrernnfl'erdiseipfinesfltetmmmans mimmmmmmmm bemmfisynmeesdammmfiddshasmmeesuibehumbemesa whale 0; in its greater attention 1:: details D mmetitreqeheealenga periedettrairfing E.Ailofthem 51. Whithetfliehlewingemwiifiesmemptnfammefltesis'? A. The light belt: fated to tight because the filament wes brake-n- B. The light bulb failed to light because the pewertn the building was eff. .The l'ghtbuflsfaiied tniightbeeause itwarsnetsu'e'wed tnttghtty. Ail at the aha-Ire Merit-em 52. tn-{tepth descriptive smdiee of specific. cultures are called A. eti'meiagim B. emmhetafles .tlolngtes eltmographies .anthrnpetogies 53. fgflammmmmmammmmma EEG-34% GEE-38% 54. fimmfimaflaltwemifiesare AWWLMWHWMM mmwmmmmm mfiuuflyandpaydmkuiaaflymmafijngmhmnbahga,MImmm$m attractive bamaaofflwairaoonom‘rc and social promise D.aando Elnando 55. WmmmifiuaadmaflafluhflEagaofMMim Aradiooa'meCamon14)dathg 3mm ammonium 53. Mapmammdaflmmimtflkefirmhmm kanEwflHmiaon ammmmgmmmm} C. mwmmvm D memmmm E thoF'lhrutnemuaBoonoar'gIr EfioottPlaatomna adaofifififition] . 5?. Anthropology can be of aarvioa to other social wanna by: supplying-them with a rich body of flat Those data are "rich“ because A. flay are o'oaa-mltmat and Mary flflwwomtmafiotadtomesaflyomempaopias of the above . Nona of the above 53. In tho 1950:; many socialactentiaiaaxolainad ma failure of mlnorlty children to do wail in achoo1 I using a comma! axolanafion. Ethnographic roaaamh suggested that those explanations were manna-bound. reflecting tho implicit aaadrmtion mode by "fiddle-claaa. white profeoahrtala that anyone who didn't sham Mr own m “as A. Minoan. B. m 0. mid. icutturafly deprtvod . maana. i 59. mmmmfimwmmmmflmflaem. Theytiy hWHnflMmaspedfiWeiMaaflnpdififlsyfiaflmmafimm headtotharflorexarmfle. mmmmmmmmmflgmma JWW‘Ee-aledflle perspective. Misfit: .emnniogieai anoiomiiumi Decadegioai Emiture-bound EU. Once mutation intreduoee new genetic material into a gene pool. the force which eervee to increase or eiiminate that material Is. A meiosis E. mitosis Geniufion Wm 51. mmmmthdWMWMammh hm B.i:anefclmiam namlaemolion mutation E. mitosis 52. A"oLIIti.Ire-hound“theor}iis A. a prediction that Is intimate he fuifiiieel' in aoat'iiouiar euthJi‘a B.atheorydeveioped bya cultural anthropologistratherthan a physioal mthmpoiogiat. C. afliemydavemdbyaaodoioglstramerflianawmanfltropobgiat @aWMmemammmmmmmm mammm. Eaflm-ybasedmoumataonofmmaee. 53. mmmmmm hmmmmmpflm Estudypmaemmngmgeaiomuetmmeydivergedflmaparentm C. shady gm‘hage to expiain oontrattporary behavior. D. Ali of the above a and o 54. Intimatway does anthropology pmvideoaaioskiile for eralintitemodem worid? A“med-leanshowtehuntgameiiweaxeeverieetinmeifiidemeaa. B. fln'lakeeualessmwnoial. C. flembhauatoseeflatwaampanofagiooalmmmmtymmermanMeomterotme WEE- itgimmageaterm‘fiuitytemaiififierenoee. offlieahoveexcqfia. 65. Thegoaiotadenoeie htodmflfluriveraaipfinoipiasfltaiwmflfiviaihhwfl. B.todeveiopexpianafimaofmeworidfltatmeteetahiearidmredable. C.toeiitninatathaneedtiouaefl1a imagination D.AlI.o‘ftha above. @aandh 5?. 53. TI}. T1. Thetifemys oiliving button societies representthesubted traitor studied bythe desu'lpfitre antlu‘opdeglcal mm A animating? B efltology C WW disdsoiiseoology mm Mammtypemlesmsrepresmt horieoftheolosstsurviving 'neturcfl'emlmrtmentsonemm Ejgmieualggyforglobel coodilimsclur‘u‘ggfltetetePeteooenesodEoeeneepoms l C a co litre reifiril E! largely meopreicléteo botsts'prisingly rich eeoeystems a and cl The so- -oelled “master association area" of the left hunter: cerebral cortex makes possible: .sccorste henci- -eye sci-ordination reasoning * precision gripping with the fightband . D i II t I . . . E. linglisfic oommmicetion r: .‘ itiheecstitiscalled: The pfirtta'tepopulation mmwammfimwdmtsscmim @els oentiroeters comprises: all m members of the ho'minitiae . the pongiclee C. all living members of the hominoides' D. all time members of the enthropoioes E. smegma as eW-mpfius MW seeks to FL disoovertheTruth oonoemingtheoriglnsofmarfltincl soothe universe Hempmtmedeinsofstreeficmerflmeagamzedreligm cooledeodoresentoeteu ii lhevaflclltyotflerwitienevoluttonism mmmmmmhmhedmfle .cmdd mammsmmwdmmmmm W Bdhdesuflteendderetopflteorieshexplainbeheflorhesosieloonlefl. ' mmmwasnmmmlmm,mmmwm stuolessocietieaofeilttmes pissesandtypes. C. Sodobgyislesssusoepfiblemmtsmmetmfluopmogymmeoengerofionnmg culture- bwndtheoriesbsceuse sociologyisrootedin Western outtise D. bends E. s, b; and o. 1'3. Avalidflo paleamfla‘ooologioai dating memos are best W as highly W- rnore arises reliable. .undepenoahle. D. highly aoourate. E. useless. 1'4. Theearfiestknonnooummoeof'mre'asreflededhslarflardiasd rrflioh‘mmntsdatesfiom may: $4.5 mien years ago 2.5 million years ago . 1.5 million years ago D. 3.5 million {sooeooI years ago E. 9.35 mfllion {350.0%} years ago. i'fi. Agoodexahiplaoffl'esdentifiomoflmdin operafionispmfidedby ammqmmmmdmdmmmm Bjnneundsbywhflwpaleommopdogisthoflaslfimsiatfiemmnm .flnenwuandsbyflidlaphysmhmanflrfis adiagrtflicamomedflnlsatmk Eeandh 76. An ethnologist can best be described as someone who fit. studios animal behavior. studles matures of the past. éWaWduflmemmmoflmm. studies {amid-re mas E. Mos nonmetal societies TI mammmmmwmmwmwmm? a. Culturalanlla'opologists sondyrmmansasbiobgioalorganismsoeoauseflieaoadlyfor sultme Is rooted in our biologlaal natures. B. Cultural anthropologistsstudyr how some people are "more cultured" than others. G. Cultural anthropologists study the rules or standards of behavior bywhich societies operated. D. Guiana! anfltropoiogisla study mamas! bel'la‘h'iur rather um those aoquirsd through biological imitanoe. andd. 3'3. Anohflogislttomeflowaplfiasflnsdermolmislo Elm ll'leinterisiuaatudyofapar‘lioularplant -.theoollecfionofhutlons El. teaching ina university E. the shah:r of dinosaurs 1'9. Lhtguislioanfla'opologyisomoemedwiflt hfludasaipfimoflanglflges. fiduh'nfioqollanguaws. Ernwlarguagenefiaasapeople'suflefilatflmgofflumldaroundfirem llaandh @13- b. and o. 11 so. Youcleanmmmpologlstwhoisonanemedidonwithmherscimtislstoeremotetcpical village. Thegeoiogist studying soil samplesfl'tepsydtclcgist is testing cognitive and affective responses. WW5oolecfingsawaardhioodhasumyongaefiI55tosmwea5flome www.mmmavwmmmmammmmmmmm nemmmmmmmmwmcmmmmmm WMMWMIWMWWWEWIMW ‘pcismf mmmmmmmemmmmmtm birdtwhidtenablesthemtomoogniaeflidmflfyplards arfiflmyhayeesoorgenmonal mmmwmmemmmmmmmpmmecham. nhoseomgrotpisdmifledas‘goodiood' typicallygeEhlswileJ Youasltthehidogistioshoy youhisdataonFTC—iastlng.andtoyomen'lazan'lentteidthatallollhenaliyesherehayetheFTc tastinggeneShudttnmenmea.yooaskd1ebhhgisttotesteyeryoneond5expedhhn,51dhe f'a'lds that no one is a FTC-taster. You temernberthat FTC is found in plants in the cabbage family. and you ask the geologist to test the soil and the botanist to analyze the "poison food" plants for FTC; they find that unusual chemicals in the soil have been used in certain plants to create a toxic substance which has the FTC chemical structure. The natives. as FTC-tasters. are able to detect the ton-tic plants. but members of the expedition are not. You hire one of the natives to help the coo odioot plants. and the expedition is saved. The uniqueness at your contribution as '51 anthropologi s. flwrahilityiosynflteslzedalabcmmanysmnoes. B. your oidasnsiye Mdgeofhotany_ C.yourbioiogiosltreining. D. mabiiitybespeakfl‘ieiocallanguoge. Eycnnahilityhgetabngwithfltepoople. fl'i. Jmmdmmfimmamm km- Ecuihnaikltlu'opology .“Etrmology @P11’ys53lfiinfl1l'opology .Paieontohgy 32. The eclectic and synthetic aspects of anthmpology combine to produce its uniquely holistic perspective on humankind and human history. From whatyou have learned this senseler. which I the following represents an appropriate. accurate, and macaques: alternative way of describing anthropology as a discipline? Anthropology is the systematic study of: A human technology [culture] 51d led-Inclogioal history. E. l'lUlTlfln ecology C thalmman organismandits adaptivehistory o. hometown-55y (attend: 33. WWWmammhflmfimmdmwha WWSWWMEWH l' 5-1- memmmmommdmmdm amatfiecovoryddiversepeoplesmhmlicaldays _,._ ---'i B flue—flarenees' dorfigfiiemne‘i'fife‘fi' Efiopemsfirstbegantonme diacoveriesofpeopl outside of Emma, that the diverse peoplesh in theworld shared a eommon mama- attempts during the i331 sent'uiy't3 35:3le'i'rI". human behafidr InTéiI'rIe of natural laws the application of biblical Ii'iyi‘l'lologylr to explain human diversityr @Mermeaheve 35. WWdMWheusedbmmflaaged .lossiiaedhones censuredwood. D.fossiflzedseashelis. sesame 33. 5: am for oooesionai bipedal iocmmtion la present among: IL ohirnpanaees H. gorillas . all M 3 fl '2 none of the above 3?. Stratigraphv is based on the assumption that layers are deposited in order: thus an artifact of fossil in a lower stratum is one found in a higher stratum . the same age as cider than . younger than _ o. likely a: he desoended from E 3:er a he metered m as. memmdmtheesofmemntpaslflmrghmmtshflbyexpm. misshnarres. and traders and through analysis of arohivai materials Eoc.iel change Ethnflhifitfil‘}? C. Cmssmulml comparison 11 Science E. Fonnulatim of W 33. Emacs}: is use-hr! tor A. crass-allure! mama's-In H. mm the phenomenon of change. {1. testing and confirming hypotheses about outsma- C. practical applied purposes such as resolving legal cases eeneeming land claims of Native erloans. 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