Exam 3 - Anthropology 34‘}: soctt'o: 2 Ball E: Taschelt...

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Unformatted text preview: Anthropology 34‘}: soctt'o: 2 Ball E: Taschelt 3'. Dec - I4. Doc- zoos Roots of Civilization - Exam 3 Exam 3 includes materials :‘rorn the lectures Tuesday. 1 Nov. {Origins of agriculture in SW Mia}! “Willi?! Thul‘fiia}: 7. December [Ancient Europe}; affiliated infomation from previous classes; :5: associated reading in Images oftlre Post. Lbs m eggists o_i‘ three Ems: l.) questions l—4fl are multiple choice to he answered on a scarttron: 2.} Questions 4t ——‘3 are multiple choice based on pictures on a separate sheet and are to be answered on the scantron, and 3.} questions 46—50 are a design-aeityprojcct Be sure you complete all 3 parts oftho exam and turn in your seantron and city design at the anthropolfigll' office- Due in the Anthmpaingy affine. 55:1. 443: by hot} pm. Thursday. 14. December. (Note: fish is 2 days later than originally planned.) Bio late exams will be accepted. We trill pick up your scantr'ohs 5: city designs {questions 46-511} at 2:00pm and leave campus. We will not return for: week. DnNflT turn ihyoureiam hie. The Anthropology fll'fice is touted on the 4‘” floor. Take the elevators up to the 4“ floor; turn right; there it is. Turn your exam 3: city design into the secretary sitting to the right of the door. He sure it goes into the “TASC H Eli - ANTI-l 349" hes, not the Bell Anth 111] box or the Mayes sloth 349 box. DD NflT PUSH YDUR EXAM UNDER THE EDGE DR PIN IT TO THE BULLETIN EDARDS ON OUR OFFICE DEIDRE... 45 questions; 1 point each + 1 question worth 5 points. Total: 5U points. Please use the short. goon Senntron form number 832435 available at the East and West Commons and Aztec shops- Take your time. Reno each question and answer carefiflly. Be sure you understand the question and the possible answers. We are not trying to trick year; do not parse the questions and answers too carefitlly. Check your answers. Be sun”: to put your name on the Seantron fitrm. You may use your textbook. class notes. power points transmitter to look carcfitlly at the more}. and any other books and sources you may wish to consult including net—line somees. Your tent-ooh; the information Wt: provide in class; and the Poweri-lomfl lions class trump information from all other classes. assigned reading in other classcS; other books [espetiofiy those written by Jared Dimmtdl}; and on-linc sources. You may wort together in goons. if you lose-w the mswersr you are not obligated to share them 1tit-rth your Friends. Ii'you share them with classmates you do not know via Blackboard or by any other means. you are incredibly stupid. Good luck. M I. _Suroerian {abide and ardmooiogy doeumoo‘. em warfare her.an {ind muting: ah: “mm-‘5 “Wing Cit! $311M in melamia. “he-h offline follow-{:g was wily not a factor ' voicing the constant warfare- Wmligion. . aeeess to raw materials. C. mess to irrigaiion water and land. D. was to marine. E. ihe need for exporuble food ourpfusei. 1. Bronze. which is much harder and more Jumble than copper. is an alloy containing 4!... gold. (é) t'm. C- silver. D. iron. E. zine. 3. The lhroeslaim’ays orme zigguraxs, amplified by the ziggum: :1 Ur dedicaled no the men god Hanna and built by King Ur-Nammu beginning in ca. 2100 EC. Wm 1115051 eriy Emotionally iflenl‘ica! to the grain procwsiooal way in m: Hen-Babylonian {:in (ca. 1542-556 EC} of Nebuehadnezzar. A True. . False. 4. What were the primary products tradoo 911; of Sumer. A. Amber and obsidian. B. Tin and mppa- _ '. Emmi-ad proehms and gohl ' Surplus grain and him. E. Cotton and Iapix lazuii. 5. The term “Fertile crescent“ refers to A. mmmarmm fonnodbylleigrisdeuplumfl Rim. m1}: hrigliui land in the delta ofme Tigris mo Euprom Him the sonihom and mtem slopes orrhe Zagros and Tarn-us War-15c: inmodem [ran like}! and the Levant. D. :1. and C. E. E and C. True- 6. Throne are many shoilarilia. 'm the content ot'SefiI-Iian krong and the royal burial; at Ur. .3- 13. False. 4 12. Mighty King Nehuchatinezzar was [he Leanna-y despot of ancici'. Babylon- 1il'fhieh ruler 0f the modern era fancied himself the rcinc-arees'e: aft-:1 yainglorious :JE enddestnfl'cd mmfl‘ “f the ancient city hydistarhing stone foundatirs :,- at. merrier to rebuild the Hanging Gardens- a‘t. King Abdullah ll of Jordan. E. lD‘sarna bin laden. Saddam Hussein. D. King l-larnad offlahrain. E. King Assad of Syria. 13. The peoples of northern and western Europe were: conside “hmbariiuis” by ancient]. Stacks. a reputation that has persisted anion-g man} "civilized" individuals living" in SW A513 and even among modern archaeologists wot-icing the-re. What factors explain this character-inflame and have helped to perpetrate it. A- aneierrt European settlements were hail: out ofwoocl and have not lufi much IIHCE upon the landscape. E. the population did not speak Greek. C". anyone who runs around with a big sword, paints their face blue, and curses {he CHP flame: to he called a “harharian.“ 13‘. stand a. E. Band o. 1-1. Lir, the City of'David, is not well known tor A. a cemetery with many “royal burials" accompanied by [lemons and precious art wodfi made with copper, enamel, and precious stones as well as many drugged and sacrificed retainers. B. a huge aiggarat. @ internal stone towers designed for flood protection. D. a library of tablets detailing the bureaucracy ofKing Ur—Narnmu’s Akkadian empire. E- palaces, temples, and harbors surrounded by a defensive wall. 15. Which of the following a .35 a errecal factor in the development of increased agricultural productivity in Mesoprflarda and Europe? I- Llae ell-rm {7. with obsidian micro—blades. D. dread manual dang. E. inorganic phosphaterfiee fertilizers. la. The modern, living relatives of [fitai'j the leernan, identified by possessing mitochondrial DEA which is essentially identical to his, are his direct descendants, is. his great, great, great . . . . grandchildren. / . True. ' False. HI 1?. Which oftlte following has. not tigfiflveiv iltfluonced modern understanding ofthn suitor-eta} being doseriiiod‘.‘ A. Hmdotus‘ discussion GI—tht SICIFIJ'IiEJIS. B. Elotner‘s portrayal ofthc Trojans in the Hard”. 'I'ite Bible '5 portrayal of Tyre and Sidon. All of the above. . None ofthe above. Cmteifomt was so porffizlllr adapted to the specific needs of Mesopotamian culture that it p istod essentially unchanged from its emergent tom: tea. 34m BC} until the time of Christ. 3. [illneifonn was developed to record economie transactions; aceotntts; property transtirr: tribute collection; disbursements; and other bureaueratie needs. C. Clnteifonn Was used to record dynastic successions and praise the exploits of Mesopotamian rulers. D. The Sornea'ian creation my}: known as the Epic oftiifogmntsh 1ivas originally mitten: in cuneiform. E. Cmeit'omi consisted ofpielogfiphic signs with no grammalieal content; therefore, it was perfectly desigmd to write a varietyT of lmguagrs. is. it ol‘lnese statemenls per-ranting to cuneiform is EDT true? n. 19. um involves the deliberate setoction of desired traits. resulting in the emergeme of plant and animal varieties that 1‘err on continued harm intervention. A. lntereropping. Bk Cultivation. C. lilo-mastication. . Horticulture. E. Evolution EU. The Natufinn peoples of the Levant region of the “Fertile Cresemt“ used siekles emitted fi'om alone blades {obsidian microli‘ths] set into wooden or bone handles to harvest wild mural ngms as mwheflt and barley which were eventually domesticated. True. H False. 21. “Citizms” ol'indcpmdcnt cilia ratherer trash: ofan mipira the __ _“’¢1'|'-‘ fl“ "£11531" tfldcrs ofthc Moditcflamon and act-Inga} suit notabic :5 {Bulk dl'T-v timber- and gas bauhlcs. ft. the Babylonians. F the Phoenician «(f—- .f'ar _ it": {3. 1h: Assyrians. D. that: Elamitcs. E. the Hittitcs. 22. The Natufian poopch ot'llic Levant rcgion of the “Fin-lilo Crosccnt" uscul sicklcs crafted from 51011: bladcs (obsidian microliths} sci into woodm or bonc handlm to han'cst Wild final grains such as cmmcr Whom. msd bailey which wcrc comically domesticated. A. True. B. False. 123. l'n-filaa'i}r unrccogniccd and unrcsolvcd prohlcrns in our prcscni understanding ofthc ancient Estonian-:1 cultures of SW Asia may no amibutccl to A. stone robbing, reconstruction and! looting of accliacological silos. E. mhacological excavations, analyses. and oxplanations bascd on Variany wall or candy infon-noil intcrprcialions ofscrlpiural writings. C. "knowing" what would bc found bctbrc hcginning an mhamlogical projcct based on biblicalflcncriplions. D. all of'thc above. E. nonc oflhc ahovc. 34- Uni-k. idcnfificsl as UH: it:in of fired: in the (Mt! Tdflflfll'flL was. on: office wofld's oarlioul true citios. Which of following statuaacncs chm not explain its stmctrrrc? (5) Th: ammonia] prochmt was fully intcyatcd into a pub-plasmas} urban grid which is a ionammi to the powm- ofth: Early maple anioiinisnation and suggests an minority similar to that ofthc great city Tunihuacan. B. The White Temple and Eggcrat ofAnu and thc Zigguni oft-anon wcrc built on sacred places and thc city W13,- gxow up Nomad thorn without a pro—Flamed inst-mm] Mn. C. 'I'hc Wrote Temple and Ziggurat of Ann acai the Ziggumt ofl'nnnna out built on Emmi pianos and subsoqnnnt :chcilding raised than above the [=ch ofthc cit}: D. The ceremonial precinct was enclosed by a wall which scpatatcd sacnad spacc from 111:.- cc'dinary world. E. The location oftcrnplc and palm within the ocrcmoniai prccirsct suggests the rulcrs dfl'ivfld their powcr From ll'lc gods .3, 15. The famous. wefldoeamcmad Autotian site of -—- partieipated in a hauling network involving local obsidian. The: scale-mt is chat-setofizod b}- a tell ofolustorod muthriek houses With Entrances through the tor-Es; W5: and domestic sanctuaries ormlaining the burials or tremrratod ancestors as well as murals mds3mholic sculptures. It. ‘Ain Mullahs -- -- '- . AbuI-iureyra | -' __ I g LTstaJhoyflknrrr rs ser - tut-1 ‘Ain (lhsyol. wt E. .Totnon. ns 26. The curved. bas—rofief panels adorning the paiaoc walls at Nimrod and Nineveh taro vary simiiatr in content to tho 'mscripttons on Mayo stolao. Which ortlto followhtg statemqu pertaining to them is NOT true- A. The mlm are frequently {Haul-ayes! ms gmis. flu Insuripfions celebrate the rulers‘ lineages and wartime bottoms. EL} Inwfipfiono below individuals III-hose hands are Stepped on by the ruler Matt his Handing relationships and min: transactions with fumign peoples. D- The ruler is portray-to a a symbol of Futility and rogers-ration. i.e. the now out-n god or the pollinator of dates. E. The ruler is portrayed as the power Imp-unsihle for keeping the comma Dl'dfil‘ in Jaime: 21 DNA studies of wisdom European populations have been used to tmswer the question “did igticultural populations from the Near East sproad into Etu'ope carrying with them the crops and .octmieal knewiodge of fanning or did local populations already sottled in Emope adopt fanning .ueltniquos and crops from neighboring agrieullural groups in the Near East?’ Which oftho bllowing best describes the rosttlts oftheso DNA studies? A. The results of the "r’ ohrontosomu study and the mitochondrial DNA stud}.r seem to :ontmdiot each other. B. Difiorerttial family size and childhood survival rates hetwocn rich and poor explain he results of the stud}: C. More males than females emigrated from the Near East to Europe- n? at] fifths: above. E. of the above. 3. Flotation has pmfitlod a tremendous amount nine-Jr information about the dusnmtieatiou ol' rsssesinSW Asia heeauseitisatechniqtieflmlisahletodisfingtfishbctwoenseudstoastediu so: to tweak up the glumes and seeds inadvertemiy toastod when dry animal dung was burnod 5 fuel. A. True. E; False. K. 29. The distribution ofmegalithie mmimrem in he. cu. SEW-2m E. MES-'5“ amoeiation IirritI't n. chambered. testes tombs. F (E. the coastal Mediterranean shresd of :gijcnitwc. C. the spread ofeartlial pottery. D. 51H ul'tl'te above. E. none of the above. 30'. Which ofthe following statements pertaining to trade it: NOT trite? A. Beginning in the Early lironre Ag, ca. JEUfl-Iflflfl BET. the Mediterranean Sea was the central trading hub of the world economy. B- The Western Mediterranean was a late a'esreni attachment to long— estahiishod trading 'ol‘kscomiceting China {silk} to forestall {tin}. An impean stimulus to trade was the Bronze Age race for With in which surplus fitted Enrica! products were exchanged for copper and tin. D. The Latin-1m shipwreck was a triumph liar archamlogy in that it provided a "m" of the process of eerie-inaction. E Phoenician hunted trade in the sonthem and water-n Mediterranean with an narrative systcan of am and sales representatives, thus restricting the Primal? Wading activities ofMfienaettns fl: Lfinoam to short-haul shipping in the north and east. 3 i. “Gilt-h of the fetter-ring might be oonsiderett a negative consequence ofihod production? A. A 1% otters: diet can result in poor nutrition. B. Increased d-qaardeney on crops can spell disaster ii'those crops should fail. C. Complete attention of the landscape for agriculture may negate hunting I gathering alternatives during pot: crop yields. D. Floods. crossing and desertification may result From the graring of domestieated animals. an ofth-e ale-true. 32. _______— ergng that city suites will emerge alt-mm. simultaneously within a ‘ single culture] and. environmental area. It is a usetiil eimeegu for explaining the rise of competing cit)- stures clun'ng the Bari}.- Erynastic pure-ind in southern Mesopotamia A. Film preset-an: hypalhcfis. E. CuaJcsterrte ofseeumlttry civilimfietts. C. Intervention for survival. D. Peer polity Mn. E. Prisfim: state mgenee. 33. How did Minoan Crete he the other ancient. Mediterranean, SW Asian and Eta-epeau culture: we studied? . 15L Craft specializatie: I: well developnl. (a. Palaces and towns were not fiittified. 1:. Trade consisted cfuita'rnitteut down~tlie—iine exchange I}. Each eomtuuniiv was self-stiflinan E- Irrigation agriculture was essential to pmduee fend surpluses- 34. “Erich offlie rinllmting 7.3 not a pristine civilization? FL Northern China on fire Huang He {Yellow River}. B. Egyptian Q; Ditties. ’ .r' Mesolithic 4. Mesopotamian. 35. Which efthe fellewiug statements does not pertain to the Bandkerarnflt cultural complex? 6) m'rapidlyspread across Europe Burn the Balkans because sulfides] islaSh—ami-burn} agriculture. B. Forensic arehaeoleg' has identified their killers as members oftiue Linear Pottery Culture beating “shoe-last” arises. C. The}: settled on small farmsteads. grew cereal grains: and raised cattle. D. Like many wealeru. frontier settlements in the l8—19tl1 insular}.r United States. Bandireiamie communities remained small because each generation moved on. E. Its distribution is merited ti}- a particular type ofponery. 36. Heiru'ieh Schliemaon‘s ereavatimfi at Troy {Him} and at Myeeum and his m of great em as hotli sites demonstrated conclusiver {or as “cmlusivelf‘ as archaeology.r ever tides anything] that the siege and destruction Ell-TIDE as recounted in Hemer's flied was very liker one. gt)- True. False- 37. ‘ilfliieh ofthe following is not associated the Phoaiians? purple dye. -_ t culturally specific. decorative ivory assets for furniture. C. the cedars of Lebanon. D. gold jetvelry with animal imagen'. : E. the alphabet. It} 38. The destruction of the central staircase ofthe Tower of {tabs} 5:25 been attributed to the Persian hing, Xerxes who wished to puoi I". the Bebylonians, and to unfinished modifications by Alexander the Great. Recent aerial photographs and apainting by Peter Braeghcl Clfiflrllr' WWI-ii, howeyer. that this story is Fiction and a rot or for the Eternenanlti's true function, which is t-‘i. a landing port for space aliens. B. an underground bunker housing .«trea 52' which has been secretly transported to Iraq with taxpayers” dollars. .. Pope Benedict XVI’S seemt space pod. $1. the location or" the mysteriously missing Ms. E. Dean Wong’s personal obseiyatory for spying on his faculty and SDSU students. 39. The site ot‘Ei-idu was excavated because it was mentioned in the Old Testament. At the time of its excavation the tetnple Was considered so important that it} superimposed structures seemm reasonable (any place mentioned in the Bible was assumed to heimportant). A better explanation for the temple’s 2t} rebuildings is that the Temple at Eridu was a shrine dedicated to Enid. God of the Abyss. ' True. - False. 4U. 1|i‘ir'tiich ofthe tellowing features of Minoan settlements suppoit the suggestion that the palaces may have tittietioned as ports-ot—trade. A. The cargo carried by the ship known as the “thubumn shipwreck“ consisted of diverse luxury produces and raw materials fiom may different sources in the eastern Mediterranean. {E}? Ground ricer storage facilities seem "ot-‘erl y large" for the probable population of the palaee and its supporting staff. C. There are many, separate. “luxury apartments" within the palaces. D. Power did not derive from overt military might. in fact, the “iconography of power” was so weakly dereloped re:- Crete that we know more about its rulers and customs from later Greek myths than dross portraits or public bragging about their exploits. E. They are iterated on islands which could be delendod lay a fleet. Questions 41-45 are t. *- t'ollowing page. Answer 1116111 on the same seantron. ll 46-50. Design an m city traction the city configurations we have studied and your '0“? creatit-ity. 1t'our city should trcltfle the 5"essential" urban elements we discussed and observed In the early cities we have studied Dean-mine what elements will he included in your city and mange them in a coherent. logical. and beautiful way so your city is safe: will 'Wt" communication with its sustaining hhnaland: and is aesthetically and ideologically satisfying. {Please do not consider Baghdad a riurctiooing city.) 'i'ou may place your city anywhere: at any time in the past: in the present although transportation may be difficult to resolve; or in the future on the earth or some other planet -' asteroid. it maybe a specialised city such as a port-of—tradc; It iiirtress city, a frontier city. or a shrine or it may he a “regular” administrative—market orcapttal city. He sure we understand your desigi intentions First—and foremost this project should be fun and scotch your brain. Use any media you wish from pencils to crayons to mariters to chalk to amodel to _ _ . andpaperol'any sizcortypc. You may use the comptner but be sure to use a format tTlF. CPT. JPEG} we can access with a PC. label your the pans of your city if they are not obvious. a “description” oi" your city in words. sentences. and paragraphs will make us fl}: chimney! If you cannot play with images get into a group that can use your intelligence or some of your other talents or make a good faith effort as ifyoti were in kindergarten. Make a view" of your city; andfor a also; order a section; anti-“w a “flattde or folded vision” in the manner ofthe Assyrian portrayals of Ninmid‘s Northwest Palace (Tu. El . Nos - slide ti}; and-or any other type ofillustration you wish. including steaming the artistic style of one of the culnnes we have studied in either the Old or New Worlds- You may work alone or in groups of NO MORE TEL-lib; 3 PERSONS, ELWLM. {If you need dispensation for this maximum. you must clear it by entail with one ofus by explaining why your group must have a members — absolutely no more] Groups mayturn in a single {elaborate} design on a single sheet or multiple views of the same city on multiple pages. [fruit wed: in musimshanstmmmot‘thsmm although individual contributions also may be indicated!!! In other words, group projects meat be declared as such andwill he graded as group projects. Designs done by a single individuals will be graded in a different category than group projects. it is NOT tuteeptaisie to design a city as a group and turn in individual Multicolor-very- simitar dgns with one person’s name on each sheet. It is NOT aeceptabie for 2 or more youps to turn in the same design. if this happens the gadewill he divided by the ntrrniierol' identicalisirnilar designs. so don‘t give your design to someone else and let them copy it. Do not bother to download a city desimi or plan hour the intranet or copy one from a hook. By this time we have seen {and have had handed-inn the tiesigns,plaiis1 oonfigmations. distant trio-we, etc. oferety early city that has been published in the last Edyenrs. lfyoo put sufficient time into finding one we havm‘t already seen. you may as well use that time to design yotn' one Your made will be honed on how many of the essential city attributes {administrative arms; sacred precincts; processional ways; crnfi arms: markets; these are hints and not clamot'rehensiycElI are included in your design; how well they are integrated into a fimctional city; ...
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This note was uploaded on 04/23/2008 for the course ANTH 349 taught by Professor Mayes during the Fall '08 term at San Diego State.

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Exam 3 - Anthropology 34‘}: soctt'o: 2 Ball E: Taschelt...

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