Chapter 4 - Chapter 4: Cell Structure History Lesson Robert...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 4: Cell Structure History Lesson Robert Hooke First person to describe structure of cork 1665 Coined the term cellulae Anton van Leeuwenhoek Far better microscope Polished glass lens First observed living cells Mathias Schleiden 1838 Schwann1839 Schleiden and Schwann proposed the Cell Theory. Cell Theory - Revisited All organisms are composed of one or more cells Cells are the smallest living things Basic unit of organization of all living things Cells arise ONLY by division of previously existing cell Abiogenesis anyone? Explaining transformation of inanimate matter into living organisms (mix oats and water get mice) Cell Size is limited As size increases Volume increases much more rapidly than surface area Cell 1 has a radius of 1 micron Cell 2 has a radius of 10 microns As radius increases by a factor of 10 Cell 2 has a surface area 10 2 or 100 times as large Cell 2 also has a volume 10 3 or 1,000 times as large Why is this important??? 3 Major components of ANY Cell Nucleoid / Nucleus Holds genetic information Cytoplasm Cellular fluid Plasma membrane Many functions (to be continued) Prokaryotic Cells Prokaryotic cells lack a membrane-bound nucleus. Genetic material is present in the nucleoid Two types: Archaea Bacteria Prokaryotic Cells Genetic material in the nucleoid Cytoplasm Plasma membrane Cell wall Ribosomes (synthesize proteins) No membrane-bound organelles Prokaryotic Cells Really good at making babies and thats all they do Prokaryotic Cells Prokaryotic cell walls Protect the cell and maintain cell shape Bacterial cell walls...
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Chapter 4 - Chapter 4: Cell Structure History Lesson Robert...

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