Saurischians 3- the theropods

Saurischians 3- the theropods - Saurischians 3- the...

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Unformatted text preview: Saurischians 3- the theropods Coelophysis , a Late Triassic theropod, Carnegie Museum public display Relationships Theropods are saurischians, as are the sauropods and prosauropods Theropoda is the sister group to the sauropodomorpha Fig. III.1 Theropoda is a monophyletic group with these characters (among others): Extreme hollowing of vertebrae and long bones Enlarged hand Vestigial IV and V digits Pits on upper surfaces of finger bones allowing extreme flexion Theropod manus, fig. 9.2 (in part), from Introduction to the study of dinosaurs by Martin (2006) Allosaur manus, fig. 9.3, from Introduction to the study of dinosaurs by Martin (2006) General Temporally, theropods are the longest lived group of dinosaurs, having evolved in the Late Triassic and going persisting today as birds (220-230 ma to present) Non-avian theropods all go extinct at the end Cretaceous Geographically, they are distributed world-wide They are known from bones and tracks in the Connecticut River Valley Podokesaurus holyokensis from South Hadley, MA Coelophysis sp. from Middletown, CT A Grallator dinosaur track from Granby, MA. Footprints such as these have long claws, suggesting a theropod track maker General information continued They came in a range of sizes, from animals only 1 m (3 ft) long, to 15 m (50 feet) long http://cache.eb.com/eb/image?id=8050&rendTypeId=4 Body plan All were bipedal animals, with arms that were much shorter than their legs Arms, in some cases, designed for grasping, none were weight-bearing Most had long, trenchant claws on the hands and feet Posture Theropods held their bodies out horizontally and balanced them over the hips with their long tails Again, bipedal, based on skeletal evidence Footprint evidence also shows bipedal progression, except in a few rare cases when the theropod placed its manus on the ground Locomotion http://bcornet.tripod.com/MassExt/rockyhlf.jpg Occasional sitting traces have been found as well ACM 1/7 a theropod resting trace,...
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This note was uploaded on 04/22/2008 for the course GEOL 111 taught by Professor Getty during the Fall '07 term at UConn.

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Saurischians 3- the theropods - Saurischians 3- the...

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