sociomidterm - SOCIOLOGY MID-TERM Andrew Sobler 1)Anything...

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SOCIOLOGY MID-TERM Andrew Sobler
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1)Anything you want: Socialization Socialization is the process by which humans or animals become assimilated into the culture where they live. For both humans and animals alike, socialization begins in the early stages of life, when the development of skills and knowledge are essential to survive within their environment. Although this also includes adults progressing into an environment vastly different from the ones they are in already, and therefore have to learn a new set of behaviors. There are things called agents of socialization, these are different people and groups that influence the way we look at ourselves, our emotions, attitudes and behavior. Such examples of these would be the family, peers, and mass media. Essentially socialization is just learning. It refers to all the learning one individual one has learned over the course of their life. In every group people have to learn the rules, standards, and expectations of that particular group. It’s the process in which people gain a social identity and learn the way of life in that society. Sociologists distinguish between five different kinds of socialization. First off is reverse socialization. Reverse socialization involves deviant behavior, that is, behavior that is not accepted in any particular society or culture. Secondly is developmental socialization, which is the process of learning behavior in a society or culture, in other words, developing your social skills and other facets of life. Primary socialization is the process in which people learn the specific attitudes, values, and actions appropriate to the society or culture in which they live. Secondary socialization is the process of learning what is accepted in a smaller group that’s in a larger society, such as a subculture would be a prime example of this. These behaviors are usually associated with teenagers or young adults, and usually involves small changes in behavior than those happening in primary socialization.
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Anticipatory socialization is a practice someone does for future positions, occupations, and social relationships. Resocialization is the process of getting rid of old behaviors and learning new ones as part of being assimilated into a new society from another one, in other words, “cleaning the slate”. The main agents of socialization are the family, school, peer groups, work, religious groups, and our very own mass media. The family is probably the main vector for determining one’s attitudes towards religion, politics, and establishing career goals. Schools are the institutions responsible for socializing young people, and teaching them the values and particular skills that are appropriate to the society or culture in which they live in. Peer groups are people in groups who are all about the same age, and share the same social characteristics. A prime example of this would be different cliques of students in high school, such as the jocks, nerds, goths, and preps. Religious groups and different religions are the ones responsible for telling us how
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This note was uploaded on 04/23/2008 for the course BUSA 101 taught by Professor Guidetti during the Spring '07 term at Northampton Community College.

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sociomidterm - SOCIOLOGY MID-TERM Andrew Sobler 1)Anything...

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