sociofinal - SOCIOLOGY FINAL Andrew Sobler 1)Violence in...

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SOCIOLOGY FINAL Andrew Sobler
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1)Violence in sports In sports that have a violent underlying to them, such as football or hockey, sometimes violence occurs that goes beyond what is allowed by the rules and regulations of that particular sport. Competitive sports such as football, basketball, and baseball may involve violent and aggressive tactics, but actual violence obviously falls outside the boundaries of good sportsmanship. Author George Orwell once said, “Serious sport has nothing to do with fair play. It is bound up with hatred, jealousy, boastfulness, disregard of all rules and sadistic pleasure in witnessing violence; in other words, it’s war without the shooting.” A possible cause of this violence may be something called intermittent explosive disorder, or IED, which is characterized by uncontrolled outbursts. It is believed some athletes, mostly male, have a genetic predisposition to violence or have an unusually high level of testosterone in them. Violence in sports is characterized by threats, verbal abuse, or physical abuse and may be carried out by athletes, coaches, fans, or the parents of young athletes. The sporting arena can also be used as a stage for countries to settle their differences to a worldwide audience. Athletes some time use violence in hopes of intimidating or even injuring opponents. For example, in boxing, extremely violent behavior by one or both of the boxers results in the fighter breaking the rules, being penalized with points being taken off, or even disqualification. The most notorious example of this happened in1997, when Mike Tyson bit off the ear of opponent Evander Holyfield. In both the stands and the streets, fans resort to violence to express their loyalty to a team, or to even intimidate opponents. This kind of violence may also be related to nationalism or as an outlet for underlying social tensions, it is also often usually
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related to alcohol use. This kind of violence can be traced all the way back to ancient Roman times, when fans of different chariot racing teams were frequently involved in major riots. Another prime example of this happened in 2003, when fans of the Oakland Raiders rioted and destroyed property after their team’s loss to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in Super Bowl XXXVII. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the amount of incidents involving overbearing parents of athletes becoming violent. Some taunt or hit coaches, players, or even other parents. Others bully their own children, sometimes as a punishment or misguided encouragement. A prominent example of this happened in 2000, when hockey dad Thomas Junta of Reading, Massachusetts, was watching his 10 year-old son at a summer ice hockey practice. Concerned about aggressive play, he started yelling and bickering at the coach. A fight ensued, and continued into the hallway. Junta, who was over 100
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sociofinal - SOCIOLOGY FINAL Andrew Sobler 1)Violence in...

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