The War on Drugs

The War on Drugs - The War on Drugs Another battle lost. A...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The War on Drugs Another battle lost… A Researched Issue Proposal By: Jeremy Ocheltree Eng-111 Prof. Chris Companion
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Jeremy Ocheltree Researched Issue Proposal Eng 111 Chris Companion The War on Drugs Another battle lost due to insufficient funding, organized public protest, and sheer carelessness. War—a word we commonly use to describe a clash amongst two opposing sides. Although it hasn’t been fought on a battlefield, this war’s ongoing statistics are downright gruesome. Established in 1971, with supportive intent since 1880 via the U.S. ban on imported opium from China, the progressive action for the War on Drugs has seen a steady decline. While optimists get a second chance at broadcasting teen drug abuse media, the opposition of users, abusers, and large drug advocate organizations are determined to force change. Listen closely to the pros and cons of each argument, discovering how we’re not so different after all. Gazing into the past, history and experiences become vital lessons to understanding the war today. Through the continuous research of scholars and vast variety of public opinion, we should try to come to a middle ground which shares common beliefs. Prepare yourself for a journey through the War on Drugs in America, opinions, bias, and statistical facts. It came to be in 1880. What came to be? Prohibition did. This is the act of declaring a (n) substance/item/act unconstitutional and therefore illegal. 1880 sparked this new term when they imposed an embargo on the importation of opium from China. Opium was a highly controversial topic among nations, and was before long discussed in Shanghai, China 1909.
Background image of page 2
Three years following, twelve out of thirteen attending nations signed the Hague Opium Convention which forbid any acts of involvement with opiates and other related drugs such as cocaine without just permission authorized by the government. There’s a great idea, hard drugs being controlled by the government and not by the citizens and aliens. Slightly delayed, the Harrison Narcotics Act of 1914 was America’s first attempt to have an anti-drug society. This act, proposed by a man Francis Burton Harrison, stated the trafficking of any opiates or cocaine to be illegal and punishable by court of law. Many were befuddled by this act, and unknowingly 5085 violations occurred of which some 4000 cases were dropped due to technicality. Once in effect, it took a mere eleven years for nations to call yet another convention. In 1925, a revision of the Hague Opium Convention was made. The International Opium Convention became the new title and contained also cannabis, ecstasy and few other substances to the list. The production, distribution, or possession of any substance stated in the convention will not be tolerated. This alerts a red flag in a minority of our country. Lacking valid medical prescription and being caught with marijuana meant serious business now. It’s easy to understand the government’s thoughts on hard-core drugs, but marijuana
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/23/2008 for the course ENG 111 taught by Professor Companion during the Spring '08 term at Old Dominion.

Page1 / 9

The War on Drugs - The War on Drugs Another battle lost. A...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online