RR5 SocratesOnLove

RR5 SocratesOnLove - In the Phaedrus Socrates makes two...

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In the Phaedrus, Socrates makes two speeches. In the first speech, he begins by stating that, as Eros is the reverse of wisdom and self control, it cannot be a good thing. This is a pleasure seeking concept and is then what a philosopher must strive to distance himself from. Socrates halts his speech suddenly for he realizes it was blasphemous in its criticism of love. As love is from the gods and the gods are divine and good, any critique of love goes against them and is thus sacrilegious. Eros is a god- not an ill-fated state of mind, but rather a “divine madness.” There are two kinds of love presented in the Phaedrus, the love of someone who is only interested in sex, and the love of someone who loves with or without sex. In his first speech, Socrates describes a lover as loving someone inferior than himself. In his recantation, he describes a person loving another as he may love a god. There are of course bad or evil kinds of madness, but Socrates goes on to specifically define four kinds of good and positive madness. The first, he says, is of prophecy. Here, a person is able to convey divine truth in a perfect combination of prophecy and insanity. An example of this would be the oracles at Delphi who speak in
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RR5 SocratesOnLove - In the Phaedrus Socrates makes two...

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