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Phil1130 - • A problem for the Theory of Forms • The forms are eternal so saying that x is f doesn’t explain why x becomes f when it does •

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Philosophy 20A Hannen 11/30/07 Website, study questions for final The Timaeus – geometric figures Platonic Theory of Matter “Firstly, then, let us consider how it is that we call fire “hot” by noticing the way it acts upon our bodies by dividing and cutting…the origin of its form, how that it abouve all others is the one substance which so divides our bodies and minces them up as to produce naturally both that affection which we call “heat” and it’s very name. –Timaeus Tetrahedron = fire Cube Octahedron Icosahedron = Water Dodecahedron All matter is composed of a single same smallest unit Indivisibles – unsplitables
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Unformatted text preview: • A problem for the Theory of Forms: • The forms are eternal; so saying that x is f doesn’t explain why x becomes f when it does. • The Demiurge – “A divine craftsman created the universe by imposing order on chaotic matter. The craftsman is supremely good and made the universe as good as it could be, given imperfect material with which he had to work. • “The god took over all that is visible…and brought it from disorder into order, since he judged that order was in every way better. – Plato (263) • “He took thought to make, as it were, a moving likeness of eternity.” – Plato (265) •...
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This note was uploaded on 04/23/2008 for the course PHIL 20a taught by Professor Hannen during the Fall '07 term at UCSB.

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