April 3 - Civil Rights Movement 1. Racial Situation after...

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Civil Rights Movement 1. Racial Situation after WW2 a. Situation in the south – Mush like the 1890s. There is racial violence, segregation. Last until the mid 1960s. White supremacy is maintained in the government, police force, etc. The south segregates everything, the circus, different sports leagues, and different waiting rooms in doctor’s office. Either separate and non-equal or separate and non-existent. The Great Migration, begins in the 1890s, picks up again in the 1930s, nigs head north. The north is segregated just like the south, few jobs, live in urban ghettos. However, better education, you can vote, etc. But after WW2 80% of blacks are still in the south. 2. Early challenges to Repressive Racial Order a. “Brown Vs. Board of Education” – NAACP case held in the supreme court, 1954, they have been challenging legal segregation since the 1930s. Topeka, Kansas board of education. Supreme court ruled that sperperate but equal is inherently unequal. Reverses what the “Plessy” case said was fair. The south then had to desegregate in public case. The south knows that after this segregation in the south is in jepordy everywhere. The south is PISSED! (We still are, ha ha). This ruling agrees with the NAACP and gives a “push” to the civil rights movement. b.
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April 3 - Civil Rights Movement 1. Racial Situation after...

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