LIT TERMS WE MAY NEED - GENERIC CONVENTIONS PROSE/POETRY...

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GENERIC CONVENTIONS – PROSE/POETRY: ad hominem argument "to or against the man" this is an argument that appeals to emotion rather than reason, to feeling rather that intellect. allegory the device of using character and/or story elements symbolically to represent an abstraction in addition to the literal meaning. alliteration the repetition of sounds, especially initial consonant sounds in two or more neighboring words. allusion a direct or indirect reference to something which is presumably commonly known such as an event, book, myth, place or work of art. ambiguity the multiple meanings, either intentional or unintentional, or a word, phrase, sentence or passage. analogy a similarity or comparison between two different things or the relationship between them. Can explain something unfamiliar by associating it with or pointing out its similarity to something more familiar. aphorism a terse statement of known authorship which expresses a general truth or moral principle. apostrophe a figure of speech that directly addresses an absent or imaginary person or personified abstraction, such as liberty or love. atmosphere the emotional mood created by the entirety of literary work, established partly by the setting and partly by the authors choice of objects that are described. colloquial/colliguialism the use of slang or informalities in speech or writing.Give conversational, familiar tone. conceit a fanciful expression, usually in the form of an extended metaphor or surprising analogy between seemingly dissimilar objects. Displays intellectual cleverness due to the unusual comparison being made. connotation the nonliteral, associative meaning of a word;the implied, suggested meaning. Involve ideas,emotions, or attitudes. denotation the strict, literal dictionary definition or a word, devoid of any emotion, attitude or color.
diction related tostyle, diction refers to the writers choices,especially with regard to their correctness, clearness or effectiveness. didactic "teaching". have the primary aim of teaching or instructing,especially the teaching of moral or ethical principles. euphemism "good speech". are more agreeable or less offensive substitute for generally unpleasant words or concepts. extended metaphor a metaphor developed at great length, occuring figurative language writing or speech that is not intended to carry literal meaning and is usually meant to be imaginative and vivid. figure of speech a device used to produce figurative language. Many compare dissimilar things. Figures of speech include, for example, apostrophe, hyperbole, irony. homily this term literally means 'sermon' but more informally, it can include serious talk, speech, or lecture involving moral or spiritual advice. hyperbole a figure of speech using diliberate exaggeration or overstatement. Have a comic effect; however,a serious effect is possible.

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